Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘coast

Ogunquit

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A year ago today we spent time inside the Ogunquit Museum of Art
in the town of the same name on the Maine coast.

Afterwards I clambered about behind the museum taking pictures of the rocks and tidal pools.

I never posted any of those photographs in 2018, so to make amends I’m showing you a few now.

As always, patterns and textures beckoned. So did colors, whether muted or bright.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

June 11, 2019 at 4:52 AM

Organic and inorganic

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At Southwest Harbor in Acadia National Park on June 10, 2018, I photographed things organic and inorganic.

Jackson Pollock‘s got nothing on me:

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

June 10, 2019 at 4:37 AM

What a wave

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Our first contact with Maine’s Acadia National Park came on June 8th. That afternoon, arriving from New Brunswick, we visited the Schoodic section of the park, which is not connected to the main part across the Mt. Desert Narrows. Like other sites we’d already been to on the Atlantic coast, this one had rocky outcrops standing against the sea. In one place I noticed how the rocks caused crashing waves to hurl their water upward.

The difficulty for a photographer was that incoming waves didn’t consistently break in the same spot, so it was hard to know where to aim. I chose a high shutter speed, put the camera in a mode that would take several pictures a second, and then stood waiting, looking through the viewfinder in the direction where some waves had already splashed up, hoping my reflexes would be good enough to press the shutter release button as soon as a wave seemed to be beginning to break. Given the difficulties, most of the resulting pictures didn’t turn out great. Still, I was happy with a few of them. The one I chose to show here pleases me because, while we usually think of waves as horizontal, the water in this one formed a vertical arc. If you look beyond the wave, you might reasonably think you’re seeing portions of a man-made wall; in fact those rocks were all natural.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 8, 2018 at 4:47 AM

Blomidon Provincial Park

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On June 6th, after the Evangeline-related things we did at Grand-Pré, Nova Scotia, we worked our way north-northwest to Blomidon Provincial Park, which had been indistinctly visible across Minas Bay from Evangeline Beach. Occasionally there’d be a break in the clouds and a shaft of light would briefly light up the cliffs.

As much water as came up twice a day from the extreme tides in the Bay of Fundy system, a little extra came down from above.

We visited at a low enough stage of the tides that we could venture out onto the beach.

Notice the rock above in the shape of an elongated heart, and the rock below covered with barnacles.

Do you remember the pōhutukawa-like trees clinging to the cliff at Halls Harbour? At Blomidon I similarly saw a lone tree at the edge of a cliff that looked like it might not be long for this world. At least it was still upright, unlike a tree in Austin two years ago that kept living while upside down.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 6, 2018 at 4:57 AM

Stonehammer UNESCO Global Geopark

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Well into the afternoon of June 7th, most of the way from Halifax, Nova Scotia, to Saint John, New Brunswick, we detoured into the little village of Saint Martins. There we stumbled upon the Stonehammer UNESCO Global Geopark. A couple of motorcycle riders close to where I’d walked onto the beach to take pictures told me that at high tide—this is the Bay of Fundy, after all—the caves get partly submerged. Below is a closer look at one of the cave entrances; you can see that the water had already risen enough to prevent people from staying dry if they walked to the cave.

For more information, click the following plaque to enlarge it and make the text legible:

Me being me, I photographed not just on the grander scale of the cave-bearing cliffs but also more closely:

Doesn’t that round rock near the center make you think it could almost pass for a planet?

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 31, 2018 at 4:50 AM

New Zealand: Tunnel Beach

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Down and down and down on February 26th went the path from the carpark toward Tunnel Beach a few miles outside of Dunedin. Eventually the trail got to the level of the upper surface of a rocky promontory. A side trail through a tunnel excavated in the 1870s allowed further descent to sea level, where I reveled in this view of the promontory’s eastern wall.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 4, 2017 at 5:04 AM

Duncan’s Cove

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duncans-cove-pacific-coastscape-7438

After visiting a wet Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve on October 27th last year, we drove over to get a look at the Pacific Ocean. The hazy view shown here greeted us in the Duncan’s Cove section of Sonoma Coast State Park. Looking lower and much less far away, I noticed some grass that had dried out but now had raindrops on it. Getting down at its level, I made this impressionistic picture of the wet grass:

raindrops-on-otherwise-dry-grass-7451

“Impressionistic” doubles as a self-serving way of saying there was so little light I couldn’t get much in focus at such a close distance.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 26, 2017 at 4:16 AM

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