Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘Maine

Ogunquit

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A year ago today we spent time inside the Ogunquit Museum of Art
in the town of the same name on the Maine coast.

Afterwards I clambered about behind the museum taking pictures of the rocks and tidal pools.

I never posted any of those photographs in 2018, so to make amends I’m showing you a few now.

As always, patterns and textures beckoned. So did colors, whether muted or bright.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

June 11, 2019 at 4:52 AM

Organic and inorganic

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At Southwest Harbor in Acadia National Park on June 10, 2018, I photographed things organic and inorganic.

Jackson Pollock‘s got nothing on me:

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

June 10, 2019 at 4:37 AM

Rhodora

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A year ago today we stopped along U.S. 1 near Whiting, Maine, so I could photograph the pleasant scene shown here. Margaret Scheid of the National Park Service told me she’s 85% confident the plants are Rhododendron canadense, known as rhodora.

Years before I’d ever seen this kind of plant, I knew the great poem to which Ralph Waldo Emerson gave that title, and which I’ve copied below.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

 

The Rhodora

On Being Asked, Whence Is the Flower?

In May, when sea-winds pierced our solitudes,
I found the fresh Rhodora in the woods,
Spreading its leafless blooms in a damp nook,
To please the desert and the sluggish brook.
The purple petals, fallen in the pool
Made the black water with their beauty gay;
Here might the red-bird come his plumes to cool,
And court the flower that cheapens his array.
Rhodora! if the sages ask thee why
This charm is wasted on the earth and sky,
Tell them, dear, that if eyes were made for seeing,
Then Beauty is its own excuse for being:
Why thou wert there, O rival of the rose!
I never thought to ask, I never knew:
But, in my simple ignorance, suppose
The self-same Power that brought me there brought you.

 

If you’d like, you can have more information about the poem.

 

Written by Steve Schwartzman

June 8, 2019 at 4:44 AM

Earthquake

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Not many people know that on this date in 1727 New England experienced an earthquake. You can learn about it in “The Earthquake of 1727” and “The Great 1727 Earthquake and the Wrath of God.” Not having any wrathful photos of New England, I’ve illustrated today’s post with a colorful scene I documented along U.S. 1 near Whiting, Maine, on June 8th. Margaret Scheid of the National Park Service says she’s 95% confident the red plants are blueberries.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 29, 2018 at 4:50 AM

Southwest Harbor

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On June 10th we stopped at Southwest Harbor on Maine’s Mount Desert Island.

That’s the island most of Acadia National Park is on.

You’re seeing some of the patterns, textures, and colors I photographed along the shore.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

September 1, 2018 at 4:55 AM

More from Schoodic

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As we drove south into the Schoodic section of Acadia National Park on June 8th, it was the forest that first called out for attention.

But the forest had a way of creeping out onto the shore.

From then on, the coast made its claim on me.

Near the end of our visit to the Schoodic section of Acadia National Park I slowly made my way close enough to a gull (perhaps Larus argentatus) to get some decent pictures. I’d have taken more, and probably from even closer, if a guy hadn’t come by with his dog, paid no heed to what I was obviously doing, and scared the bird away.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 16, 2018 at 4:52 AM

Peak experience

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Many people have their peak experience in Acadia National Park atop Cadillac Mountain. Not high even by Appalachian standards, the 1529-ft. summit of Cadillac Mountain nevertheless provides a view of the land and sea for miles in all directions, as we confirmed on the afternoon of June 9th. Because dozens of people were wandering about, I had to work quickly at times when a scene momentarily cleared. In contrast, one thing up there I didn’t want to exclude is this prominent boulder:

Smaller boulders adorned the mountain as well:

Look at the natural grooves in the top layer of rock:

And here’s a closer look at one of the many rocky surfaces covered with lichens:

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 14, 2018 at 4:49 AM

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