Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘flowers

A brighter white

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Brighter white than the old plainsman buds you saw last time are the flowers of southern dewberry, Rubus trivialis. I photographed this member of the rose family on March 15th between Arboretum Blvd. and Loop 360 in my northwestern part of Austin.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 18, 2017 at 4:57 AM

Meanwhile, back in Texas, spring has flowered

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On March 14th, five days after returning from a month in New Zealand and still jet-lagged, I felt I had to go out and take a look at spring in Austin. On the strip of land between Arboretum Dr. and Loop 360 I found a bunch of my old floral friends. Of the two shown here, Indian paintbrush (Castilleja indivisa) is in the foreground and a bluebonnet (Lupinus texensis) is behind it. I’ll get back to New Zealand in a few posts, after giving some deference to what’s happening at home.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 16, 2017 at 4:55 AM

New Zealand: kohurangi

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You can find old pictures of people with outstretched arms encircling the base of Tāne Mahuta but that’s no longer possible. Out of concern that the roots were getting trampled, the tree’s caretakers have planted vegetation around it to act as a shield (and also to restore native species to the area). Here in front of Tāne Mahuta you see the flowers of what the Māori call kohurangi and English speakers know as a tree daisy; botanists have yet another name, Brachyglottis kirkii.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 15, 2017 at 4:52 AM

So why is it called marsh gumplant?

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Grindelia stricta var. angustifolia is called marsh gumplant because it grows in marshes and is gummy (I’d have said gooey). You can see that second feature in this closeup that I took, like the previous photograph, in the wetlands of California’s Martinez Regional Shoreline on November 2nd of last year.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 3, 2017 at 5:04 AM

Again I got the genus right

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While walking in the wetlands of California’s Martinez Regional Shoreline on November 2nd of last year I saw many stands of a wildflower I assumed had to be in the genus Grindelia, whose members are generally known as gumweed. This one turned out to be Grindelia stricta var. angustifolia, called marsh gumplant.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 1, 2017 at 4:49 AM

First native wildflowers from Austin in 2017

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On a couple of recent walks I’d been hoping to spot some four-nerve daisies because Tetraneuris linearifolia can be found flowering here in any month of the year. Yesterday along Tom Miller Street near an edge of the Mueller Prairie Restoration I finally came across a few. This is a species I’ve photographed many times and shown here often enough, so the challenge was to take a different approach. For this portrait I lay on the ground so I could get some oblique blades of grass as a background. That also allowed the shadows of some blades to fall on the flowers and reinforce the grid-like pattern of the picture as a whole.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 29, 2017 at 5:00 AM

California sunflowers

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Outside the visitor center at the John Muir National Historic Site on November 2, 2016, I couldn’t help noticing a tall, bushy plant that I later learned is a California sunflower, Helianthus californicus, a species I hadn’t even known exists. Below is a closer look at one of its flower heads. Those of you in the depths of winter could probably use a dose of cheery yellow ‘long about now.

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© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 11, 2017 at 4:57 AM

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