Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘water

New Zealand: Crossing the Cook Strait again

with 15 comments

The Cook Strait, named after the adventurous Captain James Cook, separates New Zealand’s two main islands. Three years ago today we rode the Interislander ferry from Picton on the South Island to Wellington on the North Island. The first photograph shows the last rocks the ferry passes as it leaves the South Island and enters the Cook Strait. I took the second photograph out in the strait 12.5 minutes later.

© 2020 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 3, 2020 at 4:31 AM

Rainy view across to Panglao Island

with 29 comments

On December 21st, 2019, from a window seat at the Lantaw Native Restaurant in Tagbilaran on the Philippine island of Bohol we looked across the water to Panglao Island. Rain softened the view.

© 2020 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

February 14, 2020 at 4:48 PM

3000!

with 80 comments

WordPress says this is my 3000th post! If I can mix metaphors, that’s a lot of pictures under the bridge (or more accurately, processed in Adobe Bridge). As for today’s portrait in red, it’s from my neighborhood on January 18th and shows a cluster of drupes on a possumhaw tree (Ilex decidua) still wet from rain.

The mathematically attuned among you will forgive me for using a post title that could be misconstrued as 3000 factorial. The context makes it clear that I couldn’t be referring to that enormous number, which takes 9131 digits to write down. If you’re curious, you can read through them all.

© 2020 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

February 9, 2020 at 4:48 AM

Posted in nature photography

Tagged with , , , , ,

Fronds

with 20 comments

Fronds caught my attention at the Bojo River Nature Reserve in Aloguinsan on December 17th.

The challenge was finding good ways to fill a rectangle.

In the last picture I took a different approach.

© 2020 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 26, 2020 at 11:40 AM

Bojo River

with 39 comments

On our trip to the Philippines we visited the Bojo [pronounced Boho] River Nature Reserve in Aloguinsan on the west side of Cebu. Local residents of what was (and still is) a fishing village have been recruited to guide eco-tours of the Bojo River, and that’s how Eve and I found ourselves on December 17th in a slender outrigger being paddled down the quiet river on a leisurely ride. What botanical purpose the “partially overlapping pancakes” serve in the second picture, I have no idea.

We approached the farthest point on the tour as we neared the place where the Bojo River empties into the Tañon Strait. The rocks on the river banks get steeper there, as the next three pictures confirm.

The “bathtub rings” in the final two photos show how much the river rises and falls with the incoming tide.

Eventually the water got choppy, and it probably wouldn’t have been safe to go farther in such a small boat.
In the distance we could see the island of Negros.

Upcoming posts will bring you more pictures from the Bojo River Nature Reserve.

©2020 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 25, 2020 at 4:44 AM

Kawasan Falls

with 31 comments

On December 16th we crossed over to the west side of Cebu and went down to Kawasan Falls. It swarmed with tourists, the people who run it charge for every little thing, and the water has been partially diverted from the falls. Nevertheless, here are two views of the place, one vertical and the other horizontal, one full-length and the other truncated, one at a slow shutter speed and the other at a high shutter speed.

Here’s the area adjacent to the falls:

On the walk back I couldn’t help noticing a decaying palm frond in the river that flows out from the falls.

© 2020 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 20, 2020 at 4:37 PM

Still more from Coron’s island-hopping tour on December 13

with 30 comments

© 2020 Steven Schwartzman

 

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 9, 2020 at 4:39 AM

More from our Coron island-hopping tour

with 31 comments

As you’ve heard, on December 13 we went on what’s known as a Coron island-hopping tour.

It showed off the area’s rock formations, cliffs, trees, and colorful tropical water.

© 2020 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 7, 2020 at 4:49 AM

Kayangan Lake

with 32 comments

On December 13 we went on one of what are known as Coron’s island-hopping tours. The first stop was Kayangan Lake, which was so crowded with tourists that I could hardly take any photographs. At a moment when swimmers and floaters briefly cleared a spot on the opposite side of the lake, I managed to get the picture above. (How about the color of the water?) Other than that, I was limited to a few closeups of things in the lake, like these rippled rocks that appeared to be covered with neon lights:

A floating red leaf caught my attention, as did the needlefish near it:

Here’s a closer look at the needlefish:

© 2020 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 5, 2020 at 4:31 AM

Posted in nature photography

Tagged with , , , , ,

The Philippines

with 46 comments

On December 7th Eve and I flew from Austin to Seattle, then changed planes for Taipei, and finally changed once more to get to Cebu City, whose metropolitan area has the second largest population in the Philippines. While much of our 19-day trip went for family matters on the island of Cebu, including a wedding, I’d brought along a reduced version of my usual photo kit and hoped to get in some nature photography.

One Philippine province Eve (and therefore I) had never visited was Palawan, and so on the morning of December 12th we flew to the island of Busuanga in the very northern part of Palawan. That afternoon we joined a tour of the main town, Coron. The last place the tour took us was the base of Mount Tapyas, whose heights we reached by climbing 724* steps (and by enduring sore leg muscles when we had to climb more steps the next day). I see on the internet that Mount Tapyas is known for its sunsets, and it didn’t let us down.

In the first photograph the sun was still so bright that I underexposed by 3, 4, and even 5 f/stops to keep from blowing out the highlights in the solar disk. By the time of the second picture, which came 13 minutes later, I got away with an underexposure of only 1.33 f/stops, though you’ll notice some flaring on the hills beneath the sun. Just chalk it up to my usual flair as a photographer.

—  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —

* When our tour guide told us that there are 724 steps my immediate reaction was to think that 7 and 24 happen to be the lengths of the legs of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of 25 (you can do the arithmetic to verify that 7 squared plus 24 squared equals 25 squared).

© 2020 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 3, 2020 at 4:29 AM

%d bloggers like this: