Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Archive for November 2013

Pink muhly from a little farther back

with 29 comments

Gulf Muhly 8596

Oh, and if you’d like to step back and get a better sense of what Muhlenbergia capillaris, called pink muhly and gulf muhly, looks like, and why people are increasingly planting it as an ornamental, I’m happy to oblige. Like the last picture, this one comes from the grounds of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, on the morning of November 9.

© 2013 Steven Schwartzman

Advertisements

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 30, 2013 at 12:14 PM

Dropping in on pink muhly

with 24 comments

Brown Bald Cypress Sprigs Fallen into Gulf Muhly 8680

Click for better sharpness.

Muhlenbergia capillaris, a pretty grass known as pink muhly and gulf muhly, is native in parts of Arkansas as well as Texas (and various other states). I found this one on the grounds of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, on November 9. Some brown sprigs from a bald cypress treeTaxodium distichum, had fallen into the feathery grass and remained caught there.

© 2013 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 30, 2013 at 6:00 AM

Ageratina havanensis

with 21 comments

Ageratina havanensis Flowers and Buds 7775

Click for greater clarity and size.

I took this closeup of Ageratina havanensis flowers and buds on the west side of Mopac on November 5th. Common names for this bush include Havana snakeroot, shrubby boneset, and white mistflower. Don’t you like the way the pink buds are packed into little honeycomb-like bundles?

© 2013 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 29, 2013 at 6:00 AM

A horizontal look at fall color on the grounds of the Crystal Bridges Museum

with 10 comments

Fall Foliage at Crystal Bridges Museum 8666

Here’s some more great fall foliage from the grounds of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, on the morning of November 9th. It was a mostly cloudy day, but patches of blue sky appeared from time to time.

© 2013 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 28, 2013 at 6:04 AM

Color on the grounds of the Crystal Bridges Museum

with 16 comments

Fall Foliage at Crystal Bridges 8598

Here’s some fetching fall foliage from the grounds of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, on November 9th.

© 2013 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 27, 2013 at 5:59 AM

Sumacs turning red

with 19 comments

Sumacs Turning Red 8448

On November 8th, along Highway 23 a little south of Eureka Springs, Arkansas, I found a row of sumacs putting on their usual bright display of fall foliage. As we traveled I saw these low sumacs, often only several feet tall, in many places in western Arkansas and far eastern Oklahoma, but I’m afraid I don’t know which species of Rhus they are. Outside of central Texas I’m a stranger in a strange land, botanically speaking. In any case, in addition to the brilliance of these roadside sumacs in their own right, I liked the contrast they made with the larger, darker, and mostly leafless trees beyond them.

If you’re interested in photography as a craft, you’ll find that point 12 in About My Techniques is especially relevant to this photograph.

© 2013 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 26, 2013 at 6:05 AM

A closer view of American beautyberry fruit

with 31 comments

American Beautyberry Fruit 3954

Click for greater clarity and size.

Callicarpa americana is commonly called American beautyberry because of its clusters of little magenta fruits, many of which embellished the last post. On October 23rd, two weeks before the Arkansas trip, I’d made this closeup of clusters (count them as 2+ or 3-) along Bull Creek in northwestern Austin. The bunch near the center of the photograph was illuminated by a shaft of sunlight, so its colors are a little brighter than those of the other bunches.

According to the revised edition of Texas Wildflowers: “Many birds feed on the berries and will contend with each other to include a bush in their feeding area.” People, on the other hand, may admire the fruits for their colors and use leafless branches of them in cut-plant decorations, but can’t eat them. (UPDATE: you’ll find a revision of that last statement in my reply to a question from Jim, below.)

To see the varied places in the southeastern United States where American beautyberry grows, you can check the state-clickable map at the USDA website.

© 2013 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 25, 2013 at 6:00 AM

%d bloggers like this: