Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘leaves

The end of winter

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Today, March 20th, marks the official end of winter this year. Nature in Austin hadn’t waited that long. The photograph above, taken six days ago at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, shows a possumhaw tree (Ilex decidua) that had largely greened out while still densely laden with the bright red fruits it wore all winter. A clear blue sky pleasantly set off the other two colors. Aiming upward near midday let sunlight transluce the new leaves.

(Not long ago you saw a landscape view from Valentine’s Day showing a possumhaw in its winter form, which is to say totally leafless.)

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 20, 2018 at 4:45 AM

Posted in nature photography

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New Zealand: tree fern like a parasol

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Over the two years since our first visit to New Zealand, something I wished I could do again was look up and see the parasol of a tree fern. In the Manginangina Scenic Reserve on February 15, 2017, I was able to do that once more. Note the slender vine insinuating itself down the right side of the picture.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

February 16, 2018 at 4:51 AM

New Zealand: colors at Elliot Bay

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A year and a day ago we visited Elliot Bay on the east side of New Zealand’s North Island, as you saw last time in two picture of inherently low-toned patterns on the beach. Today’s post shows you that we also saw colorful things there.

Flax (Phormium tenax) turning yellow

 

Magenta seaweed

 

Patterns in a vertical rock face bordering the beach

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

February 11, 2018 at 4:43 AM

Green lynx spider with hatchlings

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Click for greater clarity.

On December 1st last year, upon approaching a prairie flameleaf sumac tree (Rhus lanceolata) in Cedar Park to photograph its fall foliage, I noticed that one bunch of leaflets had been pulled together to make a shelter. I soon figured out that a green lynx spider (Peucetia viridans) had created the shelter as a nest. Plenty of hatchlings scurried about, no doubt disturbed by my close presence and the closer presence of my camera.

Of the various pictures I took there, I chose to show this one because the two curved sumac leaflets in the upper right with the hatchlings on them somehow reminded me of a Hokusai wave. (Hey, that’s all the way over in Japan, so my imagination has a right to be far-fetched.)

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

February 2, 2018 at 4:51 AM

Prairie flameleaf sumac and clouds

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On December 1st last year we walked around a good-sized pond in Cedar Park, a contiguous suburb north of Austin. In one area I spent a little time photographing the colorful leaves of some prairie flameleaf sumac trees, Rhus lanceolata. How about those clouds? And how about this minimalist view of some backlit leaflets?

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

February 1, 2018 at 4:35 AM

Claspleaf twistedstalk

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Now there’s a mouthful for you, whether you use the scientific name Streptopus amplexifolius or the vernacular name claspleaf twistedstalk. Because very little foliage had turned colors in Waterton Lakes National Park when we were there on August 29th, the yellowing leaves of this species that we saw in several places were a welcome sight. So were the little red fruits, about a centimeter long, one of which the second photograph gives you a closer look at on a different claspleaf twistedstalk plant. Here’s a site with more information about the species. Here’s another. And here’s still another that includes ethnobotanical uses.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 29, 2017 at 4:55 AM

Red and green redux

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Continuing with yesterday’s red-and-green theme, here’s an abstract picture showing the fruit and out-of-focus leaves of thimbleberry, Rubus parviflorus, in Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta, on August 29th.

The Rubus species that’s widespread in Austin is R. trivialis.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 26, 2017 at 5:00 AM

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