Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘leaves

Claspleaf twistedstalk

with 70 comments

Now there’s a mouthful for you, whether you use the scientific name Streptopus amplexifolius or the vernacular name claspleaf twistedstalk. Because very little foliage had turned colors in Waterton Lakes National Park when we were there on August 29th, the yellowing leaves of this species that we saw in several places were a welcome sight. So were the little red fruits, about a centimeter long, one of which the second photograph gives you a closer look at on a different claspleaf twistedstalk plant. Here’s a site with more information about the species. Here’s another. And here’s still another that includes ethnobotanical uses.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Advertisements

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 29, 2017 at 4:55 AM

Red and green redux

with 8 comments

Continuing with yesterday’s red-and-green theme, here’s an abstract picture showing the fruit and out-of-focus leaves of thimbleberry, Rubus parviflorus, in Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta, on August 29th.

The Rubus species that’s widespread in Austin is R. trivialis.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 26, 2017 at 5:00 AM

Speaking of poison ivy

with 25 comments

The previous post, which showed a lush Virginia creeper vine (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) with richly red leaves, engendered a few comments about poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans). That’s understandable because some or perhaps many people confuse the two vines, even though Virginia creeper normally has five leaflets and poison ivy three (but check out a post from 2015 showing a rare exception).

So far in 2017 I’ve come across several instances of poison ivy turning colors and have taken a few pictures, none of which rival my best ones because the plants themselves this season haven’t been as attractive as in certain other years. For that reason I’ve chosen to show you a photograph from November 27, 2006, when I went to north-central Austin’s Allen Park and found stands of poison ivy that remain the most colorful I’ve ever seen.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 18, 2017 at 4:45 AM

Virginia creeper creeping colorfully upward

with 65 comments

Long-time readers have heard me say, and central Texans don’t need me to tell them, that this area doesn’t have a lot of appealing fall foliage. One exception is Parthenocissus quinquefolia, a climbing vine known as Virginia creeper or, to keep the glory from going to another state, five-leaf creeper. On December 1st I was driving south on US 183 in Cedar Park, an adjacent suburb north of Austin, when I glimpsed a vertical band of red ahead and to my right. I knew right away that it had to be Virginia creeper, and I made sure to stop and photograph this unusually good display of it.

As is almost always the case along a main road in a populated area, I had to work at getting myself into positions—typically low ones—where I could exclude poles, power lines, stores, signs, vehicles, non-native trees, and other unwanted things from my pictures.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 16, 2017 at 4:49 PM

Fall foliage in Wimberley

with 10 comments

One of the scenic places we went in Wimberley on November 21st was Jacob’s Well. There we saw exactly one tree showing bright fall colors, this rusty blackhaw, Viburnum rufidulum. I think you’ll agree that that one was enough to make the visit to Jacob’s Well worthwhile.

A couple of weeks ago you got to look at another scenic place in Wimberley.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 3, 2017 at 4:42 AM

Intimations of autumn

with 37 comments

Our time in the Canadian Rockies and vicinity lasted from August 24th to September 14th. That wasn’t late enough for any widespread fall color (as I think of grand fall color from having grown up in New York), but here and there we saw hints of bigger changes to come. The two pictures in this post are from the edge of Emerald Lake in Yoho National Park, British Columbia, on November 7th. Not only do the photographs offer intimations of autumn, but also intimations of the color of the water that draws people in large numbers to Emerald Lake.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 1, 2017 at 4:53 AM

New Zealand: weaving

with 19 comments

Do a search for Māori weaving and you’ll turn up plenty. What you see in today’s picture, though, is nature’s own weaving in New Zealand in the form of some dry fronds hanging from a tree fern that caught my attention at the Waimangu Volcanic Rift Valley on March 5th.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

September 11, 2017 at 4:46 AM

%d bloggers like this: