Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘color

Rainbows don’t get named

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Waterfalls get named. Mountains get named. Rivers get named. Deserts get named. Even people get named. Rainbows, those ephemeral creatures, get no names. Here a necessarily nameless rainbow I saw near 5 in the afternoon on May 28th after we came down from the windy top of Scott’s Bluff National Monument in western Nebraska. Whether the grasses are native, I don’t know, but the rainbow surely was.

It seems like two or even three rainbows banded together here, and I don’t know how to account for that. In checking my archives, I can confirm that multiple rainbows show up in all of the eleven pictures I took.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 1, 2017 at 5:01 AM

Not just reddish-orange

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colorful-lichen-on-reddish-rock-5863

The reddish-orange sandstone so common at Valley of Fire State Park in Nevada serves as an excellent substrate for lichens of contrasting colors, as you see in these two photographs from our October 24th visit. You can click either picture to get greater size and more details.

vibrant-green-lichen-on-reddish-rock-6016

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 25, 2016 at 4:59 AM

A vivid horsemint

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Horsemint Flowering by Clasping-Leaf Coneflowers and Firewheels 4657

In the previous post the indistinct purple in the background came from horsemints (Monarda citriodora). Now here’s a focused look at one of them, again in the Balcones District Park on May 13th. Pretty rich, huh? The supporting yellow belonged to clasping-leaf coneflowers (Dracopis amplexicaulis) and the red to the usual Indian blankets (Gaillardia pulchella).

Note: I’m away from home and will be for a while. Please understand if I’m late replying to your comments.

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

June 14, 2016 at 5:03 AM

Familiarity

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Tiny Beetles Mating on Firewheel 0136

Two of the most familiar wildflowers in Texas are the firewheel (Gaillardia pulchella) and the bluebonnet (Lupinus texensis), both of which you’ve already seen here more than once this year. The main reason I’m showing you this picture now is the action taking place in the firewheel’s red light disktrict.

Clicksy-doodle for some hanky-panky:

Tiny Beetles Mating on Firewheel 0136A

This photograph is from April 4 along Bluegrass Dr. in my northwest part of Austin.

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

May 10, 2016 at 4:56 AM

The foreground becomes background

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Wild Garlic Bud by Cedar Sage Flowers 0230

The species that was the subject of the last post—Salvia roemeriana, cedar sage—served up its flowers on a different day in a different place as an amorphous but colorfully saturated background for a bud of wild garlic, Allium drummondii, that was beginning to open. Say April 4 along Bluegrass Dr. and you’ll have it right.

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 18, 2016 at 4:59 AM

A loss of color and a chance for progeny

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Do you remember how appealing flameleaf sumac (Rhus lanceolata) can be when its leaves turn colors in the fall? Here’s a reminder from an undeveloped property behind Seton Northwest Hospital on December 4 of last year.

Flameleaf Sumac Turning Colors 0556

I went back to that property on January 12, well after all the sumacs’ leaves had fallen, and had a clear shot at this cluster of tiny fruits on one of the trees.

Flameleaf Sumac Fruit Cluster Drying Out 1786

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 31, 2016 at 4:46 AM

Belated color

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Colorful Oak Leaf Against Blue Sky 0773

I didn’t show you a lot of fall foliage in 2015, so here, belatedly, is an oak leaf I photographed along Rain Creek Parkway on December 6th last year.

© 2015 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 27, 2016 at 5:04 AM

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