Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘buds

Smartweed

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After doing my theme and variations with prairie agalinis in the northeast quadrant of Mopac and US 183 on September 19th, I noticed a colony of smartweed (Polygonum spp.) that I’d overlooked. To give you a sense of scale, I’ll add that each smartweed flower is no more than one-eighth of an inch (3mm) in diameter.

Smartweed leaves have a tendency to turn bright colors when they age. I photographed the one below in roughly the same stance as the flowers and buds above, and with the backlighting that lit up the prairie agalinis in the previous post’s close views. And how about that little curlicue at the leaf’s tip?

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 5, 2018 at 4:38 AM

Small rhododendron

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At Garden in the Woods in Framingham, Massachusetts, on June 12th, I saw budding and flowering specimens of the shrub known scientifically as Rhododendron minus and in common English as small rhododendron.

All parts of the plant are poisonous, so if you encounter it in person, look but don’t taste.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 26, 2018 at 4:44 AM

More from Garden in the Woods

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Wild bleeding heart, Dicentra eximia

Buds of black cohosh, Actaea racemosa

A species of Phlox

To see the bright white flowers of black cohosh, you can revisit a post from 2016.

Thanks to horiculturist Anna Fialkoff for identifying many of the plants I photographed at Garden in the Woods on June 12th.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 14, 2018 at 4:35 AM

Two-leaf senna

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Here’s a native wildflower I’ve never shown you before. That’s surprising, given that it grows in my neighborhood and that on several occasions I’ve shown the other species of senna that grows here. This one is Senna roemeriana, known as two-leaf senna or two-leaved senna. The common name refers to the fact that each of the plant’s leaves is made up of two leaflets; you can see one leaflet and part of its symmetric twin at the lower left in the photograph.

I took this picture beneath the power lines west of Morado Circle one month ago today.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

May 17, 2018 at 4:52 AM

Engelmann daisies

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I know the Engelmann daisy, Engelmannia peristenia, only from central Texas, yet the USDA map shows a distribution up through the Great Plains into South Dakota. Botanists refer to the genus Engelmannia as monotypic, meaning that it contains just one species. Call that species an only child and no one will fault you for the analogy.

The picture above shows the bud of an Engelmann daisy opening in front of an Indian paintbrush, Castilleja indivisa. The photograph below lets you see what the open and opening flower heads of an Engelmann daisy look like. Both pictures are from Blackland Prairie remnants in Round Rock on April 8th.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

May 7, 2018 at 4:59 AM

Antelope-horns milkweed buds and flowers

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You’ve already seen how on April 5th the median in Morado Circle played host to rain-lilies and anemones, wild garlic and four-nerve daisies, and a white bluebonnet. Also growing there was Asclepias asperula, the most common milkweed species in central Texas. This picture is the latest reminder that milkweeds do things in fives.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

May 5, 2018 at 4:59 AM

Fireweed at the edge of Emerald Lake

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On September 7th, Yoho National Park‘s Emerald Lake served as a pastel backdrop for these buds and flowers of fireweed, Chamaenerion angustifolium.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 23, 2018 at 4:48 AM

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