Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘buds

Three stages of wild garlic

with 31 comments

Above is a little packet of wild garlic buds (Allium drummondii) on Floral Park Dr. in my neighborhood on March 30. The second picture, taken during the same photo session, shows how buds give way to flowers.

And below from April 1st along Balcones Woods Drive is a colony of wild garlic flowers that had fully opened.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Advertisements

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 14, 2019 at 4:37 AM

Another first appearance here for a wildflower

with 21 comments

Way back on February 18th I found a bunch of stemless evening primroses, Oenothera triloba, flowering in a lot along Balcones Woods Dr. I don’t recall ever photographing (or at least identifying) this species before, so naturally this is its first appearance here. The two things in the first photograph that look rather like chili peppers are buds. Aiming straight down is the stance I least often adopt when doing portraits in nature because so much that’s on the ground around the subject shows up and often distracts from it. In this case it seemed okay because the flower was so much brighter than the leaves and stems below it.

For the second photograph I lay down and aimed sideways to take advantage of the backlighting that rendered the flower translucent and cast the shadows of its inner parts toward me, and now also toward you.

To see the many places in the United States where this species grows, you can check out the USDA map. The scroll bar to the left of the map lets you zoom in to the county level.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 12, 2019 at 4:30 AM

Southern dewberry flower and bud

with 27 comments

While at Mills Pond on February 24th I found my first southern dewberry flowers, Rubus trivialis, for 2019 (and I’ve continued seeing others since then). In case you’re wondering about the scale, each flower in this species is about an inch (2.5cm) across. Can you tell that this little wildflower is in the rose family?

When I got closer for a few portraits of the flowers I noticed a bud that had begun to open.

As my skin keeps confirming, southern dewberry canes (stems) are very prickly, another resemblance to rose bushes. In the lower left corner of the bud picture you get a side view of one prickle, softened not in reality but by appearing out of focus. In contrast, what look like dark red “claws” on the bud aren’t prickly. Notice also that the prominent pink in the bud has faded to a faint trace in the open flower.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 10, 2019 at 4:22 AM

Smartweed

with 24 comments

After doing my theme and variations with prairie agalinis in the northeast quadrant of Mopac and US 183 on September 19th, I noticed a colony of smartweed (Polygonum spp.) that I’d overlooked. To give you a sense of scale, I’ll add that each smartweed flower is no more than one-eighth of an inch (3mm) in diameter.

Smartweed leaves have a tendency to turn bright colors when they age. I photographed the one below in roughly the same stance as the flowers and buds above, and with the backlighting that lit up the prairie agalinis in the previous post’s close views. And how about that little curlicue at the leaf’s tip?

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 5, 2018 at 4:38 AM

Small rhododendron

with 25 comments

At Garden in the Woods in Framingham, Massachusetts, on June 12th, I saw budding and flowering specimens of the shrub known scientifically as Rhododendron minus and in common English as small rhododendron.

All parts of the plant are poisonous, so if you encounter it in person, look but don’t taste.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 26, 2018 at 4:44 AM

More from Garden in the Woods

with 15 comments

Wild bleeding heart, Dicentra eximia

Buds of black cohosh, Actaea racemosa

A species of Phlox

To see the bright white flowers of black cohosh, you can revisit a post from 2016.

Thanks to horiculturist Anna Fialkoff for identifying many of the plants I photographed at Garden in the Woods on June 12th.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 14, 2018 at 4:35 AM

Two-leaf senna

with 18 comments

Here’s a native wildflower I’ve never shown you before. That’s surprising, given that it grows in my neighborhood and that on several occasions I’ve shown the other species of senna that grows here. This one is Senna roemeriana, known as two-leaf senna or two-leaved senna. The common name refers to the fact that each of the plant’s leaves is made up of two leaflets; you can see one leaflet and part of its symmetric twin at the lower left in the photograph.

I took this picture beneath the power lines west of Morado Circle one month ago today.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

May 17, 2018 at 4:52 AM

%d bloggers like this: