Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘wildflower

Truncated and therefore asymmetric abstraction of a prickly pear cactus bud and flower

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Here’s an abstract portrait of a bud and flower of a Texas prickly pear, Opuntia engelmannii var. lindheimeri, along floral Park Dr. in my neighborhood on April 7th.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 29, 2017 at 4:38 AM

New Zealand: two plants to ward off scurvy

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On the grounds surrounding the museum in Russell on February 10th I found various cultivated native plants, along with little signs that identified some of them. The one shown above is Apium prostratum subsp. prostratum var. filiforme (yikes!), known in Māori as tutae koau and in English as shore celery and New Zealand celery. The one shown below is Lepidium oleraceum, called nau in Māori and Cooks [sic] scurvy grass in English. British sailors ate both of them to ward off scurvy, as the last link and another explain in more detail; in fact those plants were the first two ever gathered for food by Europeans in New Zealand.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 23, 2017 at 4:56 AM

What f/2.8 will get you

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A large aperture of f/2.8 will get you a soft portrait like this one of a rain-lily bud (Cooperia pedunculata) on Floral Park Dr. in my neighborhood on April 1st.

I threw away many of the pictures I took of this bud because I hadn’t managed to get enough in focus to please me. In this frame I was surprised that I got good focus not only on the nearest surface of the bud but also on the tip of the maroon sheath.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 14, 2017 at 5:00 AM

Wild garlic buds opening

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Allium drummondii between Arboretum Blvd. and Loop 360 on March 14.

Point 4 in About My Techniques is relevant to today’s photograph.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 25, 2017 at 5:04 AM

So why is it called marsh gumplant?

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Grindelia stricta var. angustifolia is called marsh gumplant because it grows in marshes and is gummy (I’d have said gooey). You can see that second feature in this closeup that I took, like the previous photograph, in the wetlands of California’s Martinez Regional Shoreline on November 2nd of last year.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 3, 2017 at 5:04 AM

Again I got the genus right

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While walking in the wetlands of California’s Martinez Regional Shoreline on November 2nd of last year I saw many stands of a wildflower I assumed had to be in the genus Grindelia, whose members are generally known as gumweed. This one turned out to be Grindelia stricta var. angustifolia, called marsh gumplant.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 1, 2017 at 4:49 AM

Looking the other way in a different way

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Along the lines of yesterday’s post, when I was at the Grand Canyon on October 19th I did my share of looking down. I also did a little looking away from the canyon, and that’s when I found a native plant I’d never even heard of: Chamaebatiaria millefolium. It goes by the common names desert sweet and fernbush, and you can see that its leaves do look ferny. Chamaebatiaria is a monotypic genus; that means it includes only one species, which is therefore this one. If the white flower looks a little like a rose, it’s because this genus is in the rose family.

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 13, 2016 at 4:59 AM

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