Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘wildflower

Blister beetle on Penstemon cobaea

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On April 8th in Round Rock I came across this blister beetle in the genus Pyrota, apparently P. lineata or P. bilineata. The flower is the kind of foxglove, Penstemon cobaea, that you saw from farther back in a post here last month. Thanks to bugguide.net for identifying the genus of the beetle.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

May 15, 2018 at 5:05 AM

Winecups

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Behold some winecups, Callirhoe involucrata, at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center on May 6th. Below is a closeup of a standing winecup, Callirhoe pedata. In both species, the petals are about an inch long.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

May 13, 2018 at 4:56 AM

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Engelmann daisy leaf

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One thing that distinguishes the Engelmann daisy, Engelmannia peristenia, from so many other yellow daisies is the plant’s leaves, both in their lobed shape and in their fuzzy texture. I photographed this backlit Engelmann daisy leaf on the vanishing prairie in Round Rock on April 8th.

Here it is a month later and I’m still seeing Engelmann daisies around Austin.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

May 9, 2018 at 4:48 AM

A tiny bee

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Strangely, this tiny bee didn’t leave the Texas stork’s bill (Erodium texanum) even when I handled the flower. To give you a sense of scale, I’ll add that flowers of this species are about one inch across (for the metrically minded, that’s 2.5 cm). If you’d like a closer look at the unbothered bee, click the icon below. The date was April 1st, Easter Sunday, and the place was Yaupon Dr. in my extended neighborhood.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 16, 2018 at 5:01 AM

Southern dewberry flower and opening bud

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Rubus trivialis; Great Hills Park; March 29. If crinkles are your thing, this flower’s for you.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 7, 2018 at 4:47 AM

Two days later

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The previous post showed a close view from two days ago of a reddish rain-lily stalk (Cooperia pedunculata) barely poking above the ground. This morning I went back to the same place in my neighborhood and found some of the rain-lilies had progressed to the stage shown here: this flower stalk had risen to its full height, in the process pushing through and casting aside its maroon sheath in the way that a rocket launched into space releases its moorings upon takeoff. The flower had yet to open fully, perhaps held back by the overcast sky.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 1, 2018 at 8:10 PM

When red precedes white

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A few days ago Austin got some rain, which people here appreciated because until then we’d dropped to some five inches below average for the year so far. The rain got me thinking about rain-lilies, Cooperia pedunculata, and yesterday I found a few whose flower stalks had poked up about an inch above the ground. Thanks to the magic of a macro lens, what you’re seeing here is therefore much larger than life. Another discrepancy is that although rain-lilies are known for their graceful white flowers, this picture shows that the buds start out mostly reddish.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 31, 2018 at 4:47 AM

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