Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘flower

Halberdleaf rosemallow flower backlit

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Near the end of my foray through the land in the northeast quadrant of Mopac and US 183 on August 22nd I noticed a halberdleaf rosemallow plant (Hibiscus laevis) some distance away and in a place that was hard to get to. I used my long zoom lens at its maximum 400mm focal length to make this portrait of a backlit flower.


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Here’s a good but sad and disturbing article offering yet another confirmation that many American universities have become indoctrination camps with no tolerance for dissent from woke orthodoxy.

© 2021 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

September 17, 2021 at 4:45 AM

Tiny bee on a rain-lily

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On August 20th at the Hanna Springs Sculpture Garden in Lampasas
I found this tiny bee on a rain-lily, Zephyranthes chlorosolen.



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The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is making like it’s the Centers for Language Control. Yup, that branch of the American government earns the George Orwell Newspeak Award for its latest pronouncements in the world of reality spinning or outright denial. Here are some lowlights.

You shouldn’t say “genetically male” or “genetically female” but rather “assigned” or “designated” “male/female at birth.” This supposedly scientific branch of the government is okay with canceling the science of genetics.

The CDC is big on converting a simple word into a string of words. “Smokers” should be “people who smoke.” Was anyone so in danger of assuming that smokers might include squirrels or vultures that we need to specify that smokers are actually people? Similarly “the uninsured” should be “people who are uninsured,” which thankfully rules out bumblebees, potatoes, and walruses. “Koreans” should be “Korean persons,” I guess so that we don’t mistakenly include any of the Koreans’ pets.

“The homeless” should be “people experiencing homelessness.” Though not in the list, “the clueless” should presumably be called “people experiencing cluelessness.” Actually it’s shorter to replace that with “the CDC.”

But brevity is clearly not the goal in the new suggestions. Anti-brevity is, and therefore the CDC has done at best a middling job. Think about all the missed opportunities for expansionism. “White” could have been “people characterized by having a low melanistic pigmentation and therefore capable of being noticed in dark rooms more easily than people belonging to certain other ethnoracial groups with greater melanistic pigmentation.”

Some of the CDC’s advice does get anti-brief. For example:

“People/communities of color” is a frequently used term, but should only be used if included groups are defined upon first use; be mindful to refer to a specific racial/ethnic group(s) instead of this collective term when the experience is different across groups. Some groups consider the term “people of color” as an unnecessary and binary option (people of color vs. White people), and some people do not identify with the term “people of color”.

“Although the term “LGBTQIA2” is recommended, no explanation is given for what all the letters and the one number mean. The CDC’s new guidelines also missed the chance to announce a contest to determine what the next change to that ever-lengthening alphanumeric string should be. Will the “2” gradually go up to “3” and “4” and so on, in the same way the leading digit on California license plates has done over the past several decades? Or should the string get longer, for instance “LGBTQIA2VM6YR7”? Maybe not, as people might confuse it with a car’s VIN (Vehicle Identification Number). Or, like online passwords, maybe at least one special character should be required, e.g. “LGB#TQIA2V%M6YR7.” No hacker’s ever gonna crack that.

A cynic might say that all the CDC’s changes and complexities will be used to justify hiring a cadre of language consultants to interpret the new terms and rules to hapless bureaucrats (forgive my redundancy). Those language consultants will swell the ranks in the army of diversity, equity, and inclusion consultants already on the dole, thereby revealing the true goal of an ever larger government whose minions regulate all aspects of our lives.

But hey, what do I know? I’m just a person who engages in thinking—formerly known as a thinker.

© 2021 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

September 4, 2021 at 4:34 AM

Prairie parsley seeds by purple bindweed flowers

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From August 22nd in the northeast quadrant of Mopac and US 183 comes a portrait of prairie parsley seeds (Polytaenia sp.) in front of several purple bindweed flowers (Ipomoea cordatotriloba). I don’t remember taking a picture like this one before, so here’s to novelty. Pitchforks, anyone?


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Another Recent Case of Media Censorship
(I could probably post a new example every day.)

Facebook Suspends Instagram Account of Gold Star Mother Who Criticized Biden.

Facebook’s later admission that the account was “incorrectly deleted” is technically true but doesn’t
change the fact that once again an employee or a politically biased algorithm did delete an account.

© 2021 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

September 2, 2021 at 4:35 AM

Pale umbrellawort

with 20 comments

Making its debut here today is Mirabilis albida, apparently known as pale umbrellawort, white four o’clock, and hairy four o’clock. I found this one on August 22nd—though six-and-a-half hours earlier than four o’clock—in the northeast quadrant of Mopac and US 183. The USDA map shows the species growing in places as far apart as Quebec and southern California.


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Did you hear the latest news about equity in mathematics? Because the word odd has negative connotations like ‘strange’ and ‘not usual,’ a group of college math students demanded that all whole numbers, whether previously considered odd or even, must now be designated even. Professors of mathematics immediately apologized to the students for the centuries of evenist domination they’d been complicit with, and they promised that no future syllabi or textbooks would perpetuate evenism.

Then an ideologically purer subset of students took issue with the first group, asking why they’d stopped at the whole numbers, which comprise only a tiny oppressive elite of all numbers. The second student group began chanting “Hey hey, ho ho, fraction-phobes have got to go.” The original student group found that chant, especially the “hey hey, ho ho” part, so profound they immediately recognized the disparate impact that their “all whole numbers are even” decree would have on fractions. They agreed that the sacred value of inclusion requires that fractions be included as whole numbers from now on. The mathematics professors promptly issued an apology for not having recognized their unconscious bias against fractions.

It didn’t take long before a third group of math students more woke than the second group started agitating because of the harm that would still befall the irrational numbers, which can never be expressed as fractions no matter how much affirmanumerative action colleges and government agencies give them. Imagine those numbers going through life saddled with the name irrational, as if they’re not in their right mind! The second student group soon confessed their lack of inclusiveness and agreed, for the sake of belonging, that all numbers will now belong to the set of whole numbers. The mathematics professors quickly issued an abject apology for othering the numbers they hadn’t previously accepted as whole numbers.

Barely had things settled down when a fourth group of math students complained that all the previous groups were still oppressors because categorizing numbers in any way at all is racist. For the sake of equity, the fourth group insisted that the only allowable view is that all numbers are equal. From now on, no matter what number a student comes up with as an answer to a question on a math test, that answer has to be correct because all numbers are equal. Similarly, students must now be allowed to pay whatever amount they want for tuition because any number of dollars is equal to any other number of dollars. The mathematics professors immediately acceded to the new demands and issued a deep apology for the violence caused by their previous silence about all numbers actually being equal.

But then a fifth group of students pointed out that all those changes were meaningless because, let’s face it, mathematics is based on objectivity and rigor, which are tools of the cisheteronormative white supremacist patriarchy. The mathematics professors, without even waiting to hear the fifth student group’s demands for change, realized that the only proper course of action was to stop studying and teaching the horrid subject of mathematics altogether, so they shut down the mathematics department. In its place they created a new department to offer Doctorates in Diversity Training (DDT).

Okay, so all those things didn’t really happen—at least not yet. Give it a few months.

© 2021 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 29, 2021 at 4:35 AM

But soft, what light on yonder flower falls?

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The date was August 13th, and the place was a property along Wells Branch Parkway at Strathaven Pass on the Blackland Prairie in far north Austin. You’ve already seen a flowering colony of partridge pea plants there, so now here’s a closeup of a single Chamaecrista fasciculata flower as it opened. Notice how the reddish blush shades through orange to yellow as your eyes follow it away from the flower’s base.


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Our word coincidence comes from Latin, where co meant ‘together with,’ in meant ‘into,’ and cid came from a root that meant ‘to fall.’ A coincidence is ‘things falling into each other.’ The night before last a 1929 movie shown on Turner Classic Movies ‘fell into’ tragic current events. The film, mostly a romantic comedy, was The Love Parade, directed by Ernst Lubitch. The movie marked the screen debut of Jeanette MacDonald, who played Queen Louise in the imaginary country of Sylvania. Opposite her was Maurice Chevalier as the hitherto womanizing military officer Count Alfred Renard (which happens to mean ‘fox’ in French). A synopsis of the film says this: “Queen Louise’s cabinet are worried that she will become an old maid, and are delighted when she marries the roguish Count Renard. Unfortunately, he finds his position as Queen’s Consort unsatisfying and without purpose, and the marriage soon runs into difficulties.”

In a scene that shows the wedding between the royal Louise and the commoner Alfred, the dignitaries include the ambassador from Afghanistan (there’s the coincidence with this week’s tragic events). After the priest follows royal protocol and pronounces the newly married couple “wife and man,” the ambassador comments in a fake language: “A singi. A na hu. A na hu. Prostu, pass harr. Fo malu a yu.” The Sylvanian Prime Minister asks what that means, and the Afghan ambassador’s translator tells him: “He says, man is man and woman is woman. And if you change that, causes trouble. He does not see how any man could stand being a wife. And therefore, he hopes this will be a most unhappy marriage.” The Prime Minister replies: “For heaven’s sake, if he reports this to Afghanistan. Tell him, this is a love match. It will be the happiest marriage in the world.”

Unfortunately, the two-decade involvement of the United States and Afghanistan didn’t end up being the happiest marriage in the world. Things fell apart.

© 2021 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 26, 2021 at 4:22 AM

Standing winecup revisited

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Here are two more portraits of standing winecups, Callirhoe digitata, from the dedicated
little wildflower area at the Floral Park entrance to Great Hills Park on July 23rd.


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Continuing from yesterday with more pictures of this kind of wildflower, standing winecups, symbolizes my wanting to continue with the theme of yesterday’s commentary: the justice system should deal similarly with similar criminal offenses. Alas, that has not at all been the case with the chaotic events of 2020–21 in the United States.

Throughout the second half of 2020, rioters attacked various institutions of our democracy. Among the earliest targets was the Third Precinct police station in Minneapolis. A mob burned it, along with nearby buildings, on May 28th.

Portland, Oregon, was especially hard hit in 2020. On May 29 at the Multnomah County Justice Center, “some crowd members made it inside the building, setting fires while corrections records staff were working inside. Others fanned out across downtown, vandalizing and looting as they went… While many Independence Day celebrations had to be canceled or altered due to the coronavirus pandemic, downtown Portland had plenty of fireworks. After a couple weeks of dwindling crowd sizes, another riot was declared when people launched mortars and other fireworks near the Justice Center and Federal Courthouse, prompting a clash with police and federal officers.” By Labor Day last year, Portland had already had a hundred nights of rioting. Many more followed.

On May 31st in Washington, D.C., rioters tried to storm the White House: “Uniformed Secret Service officers made six arrests Friday night after ‘Justice for George Floyd’ protests. A total of 11 Secret Service officers were taken to hospitals in the D.C. area, according to officials. With 60 uniformed officers protecting the area around the White House, the Secret Service said its officers were kicked, punched and exposed to bodily fluids. Bricks, rocks, bottles, fireworks and other items were also reportedly thrown at the Secret Service, who with U.S. Park Police, held the area by using riot gear, pepper spray and rubber bullets to deter violent riots that ensued after peaceful protests. ‘Demonstrators repeatedly attempted to knock over security barriers on Pennsylvania Avenue,’ a Secret Service statement said. ‘Some of the demonstrators were violent, assaulting Secret Service Officer and Special Agents with bricks, rocks, bottles, fireworks and other items. Multiple Secret Service Uniformed Division Officers and Special Agents suffered injuries from this violence.'” The Secret Service was worried enough about the mob breaking through their lines that it moved the President into a bunker.

I could go on and on, but you get the point. There were hundreds of riots last year. Insurance claims just from the initial period of May 26–June 8, 2020, are estimated at between one and two billion dollars, making the 2020 riots by far the costliest in U.S. history. By the end of August, in Minneapolis–St. Paul alone “nearly 1,500 businesses were heavily damaged in the riots, and many were completely destroyed.” Thousands of people there, many of them minorities, got put out of work as a result.

And rioters murdered people. “A retired police captain fatally shot during looting in St. Louis was passionate about helping young people and would have forgiven those behind the violence on the city’s streets, his son says. David Dorn, 77, was killed while responding to an alarm at a pawnshop overnight Monday, St. Louis Police Department announced in a news conference Tuesday.

And yet relatively few of 2020’s rioters, looters, arsonists, and murderers have been prosecuted.

Now compare those seven months of frequent, violent, destructive rioting in 2020 with what took place in Washington, D.C., over several hours on a single day, January 6, 2021. A mob broke into the Capitol. Some of the rioters damaged the building and assaulted police.

Justice requires, and I wholeheartedly agree, that all of those January 6th rioters should be prosecuted to the full extent the law allows. Our government has indeed put enormous resources into identifying the perpetrators and arresting some 570 of them in places all around the country.

In the last few years, activists on the left have been pushing for and increasingly succeeding in institutionalizing “bail reform,” which means that many people indicted for crimes are allowed bail without having to post any bond money at all. On June 1st, 2020, Kamala Harris urged people to help out rioters who had been arrested: “If you’re able to, chip in now to the @MNFreedomFund to help post bail for those protesting on the ground in Minnesota.” Contrast that with the fact that a few of the people indicted in connection with the January 6th riot at the Capitol have been denied bail. One rationale the judicial system put forth for denying bail is that the people in question organized the riot. However, after more than half a year of extensive investigation, yesterday the news broke that “the FBI has found scant evidence that the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol was the result of an organized plot to overturn the presidential election result, according to four current and former law enforcement officials.”

And yet the riots throughout 2020 did have organizers and provocateurs, most noticeably members of the group that calls itself antifa, who have never even been charged, let alone held without bail.

Some of those indicted for the January 6th riot have been held in solitary confinement, despite the fact that many on the political left have long been making the case against that practice.

In some cases the government has refused to give defendants and their lawyers relevant video footage recorded in and around the Capitol on January 6th. In other cases the government has placed onerous restrictions on defendants and their attorneys who need access to relevant video.

One of the rioters inside the Capitol, Ashli Babbitt, was shot and killed by a police officer, apparently with no warning. That killing may have been justified, but to this day, more than seven months later, the authorities still refuse to identify the police officer or give an account of the event, even to the slain woman’s family. Contrast that with the clamor in recent years to have authorities release within days or even hours the name of every policeman involved in a fatal shooting.

I’m not aware of a single person in 2020 who used the word insurrection to characterize seven months of sustained attacks on the institutions of American democracy: thousands of police officers committed to keeping the peace while allowing people to protest; various police stations and courthouses; and even the White House. Yet when it came to the January 6th riot, activists, politicians, and the media on the left acted as if a commandment had come down from on high: “Thou shalt not fail to call this an insurrection,” and they faithfully obeyed.

Even-handed justice requires that prosecution of rioters with leftist ideologies be carried out as thoroughly and vigorously as prosecution of rioters with rightist ideologies. That’s not what has happened. Our legal system has treated the two groups very differently, and in so doing has blatantly denied equal justice under the law.

© 2021 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 21, 2021 at 4:32 AM

Standing winecup and clouds

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On July 23rd in the dedicated little wildflower area at the Floral Park entrance to Great Hills Park I made some portraits of standing winecups, Callirhoe digitata, yet another member of the botanical family that has featured prominently here in recent posts, the Malvaceae, or mallow family. I’m fond of portraits in which a wildflower seems to be soaring above the clouds, as in this case. For that perspective I get down close to or actually on the ground.


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For as long as I can remember, I’ve believed that our legal system should treat similar things similarly. (Don’t you believe that, too?) For example, it never made sense to me that adults could legally drink alcohol but not smoke marijuana, especially since drinking large amounts of alcohol causes much more damage to individuals and society than consuming large amounts of marijuana. Of course use of either drug entails responsibility: no one should drive drunk or high. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, “Driving under the influence of drugs (DUID) appears to be a growing factor in impaired-driving crashes,” and some jurisdictions are considering drugged-driving laws that would be on a par with drunk-driving laws, now that increasingly many states have been legalizing marijuana.

I bring up my longstanding belief that the legal system should treat similar things similarly because I recently started reading the 2021 book Noise, by Daniel Kahneman, Olivier Siboney, and Cass R. Sunstein. Daniel Kahneman, 2002 Winner of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, is the author of Thinking Fast, Thinking Slow, which I read several years ago and recommend to you. Olivier Sibony “is a professor, author and advisor specializing in the quality of strategic thinking and the design of decision processes.” Cass R. Sunstein is a professor at the Harvard Law School and the author of various books.

Early in the new book Noise comes a consideration of the sentences meted out to people convicted of similar crimes. In the book’s parlance, such sentences have been “noisy,” meaning they’ve shown undesirably large variation. The book points out that as far back as 1973 Judge Marvin Frankel drew attention to the disparities in sentencing for similar crimes. As a result, a study was done in 1974: “fifty judges from various districts were asked to set sentences for defendants in hypothetical cases summarized in identical pre-sentence reports. The basic finding was that ‘absence of consensus was the norm’ and that the variations across punishments were ‘astounding.’ A heroin dealer could be incarcerated for one to ten years, depending on the judge. Punishments for a bank robber ranged from five to eighteen years in prison. The study found that in an extortion case, sentences varied from a whopping twenty years imprisonment and a $65,000 fine to a mere three years imprisonment and no fine. Most startling of all, in sixteen of twenty cases, there was no unanimity on whether any incarceration was appropriate.”

Studies in subsequent years found similar disparities. In 1984 the U.S. Congress, responding to those studies, passed the Sentencing Reform Act. The law “created the US Sentencing Commission, whose principal job was clear: to issue sentencing guidelines that were meant to be mandatory and that would establish a restricted range for criminal sentences.” A later study compared sentences for certain offenses in 1985, under the old system, with those in 1989 and 1990, under the new system. “For every offense, variations across judges were much smaller in the later period, after the Sentencing Reform Act had been implemented.”

It will probably come as no surprise to you that in spite of the much better uniformity in sentencing that was documented after the guidelines created by the US Sentencing Commission went into effect, many judges complained that they could no longer adequately take account of the particulars in individual cases. “Yale law professor Kate Stith and federal judge José Cabranes wrote that ‘the need is not for blindness, but for insight, for equity,’ which ‘can only occur in a judgment that takes account of the complexities of the individual case.'” In 2005, the United States Supreme Court struck down the obligatory guidelines; they became “merely advisory.” The authors of Noise note that “seventy-five percent of [federal] judges preferred the advisory regime, whereas just 3% thought the mandatory regime was better.”

The result was what could be expected. Harvard law professor Crystal Yang investigated, gathering the data for almost 400,000 criminal defendants. Her study found that in comparison with sentences under the obligatory regime, the disparity in sentencing doubled under the advisory regime. “After the guidelines became advisory, judges became more likely to base their sentencing decisions on their personal values… After the Supreme Court’s decision, there was a significant increase in the disparity between the sentences of African American defendants and white people convicted of the same crimes… Three years after [Judge] Frankel’s death in 2002, striking down the mandatory guidelines produced a return to something more like his nightmare: law without order.” So much for “equity.”

© 2021 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 20, 2021 at 4:37 AM

Portraits from our yard: episode 11

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On July 15th artsy me couldn’t resist making this portrait of a Turk’s cap flower
(Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii) viewed from the tip of its long central column.


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Probably not a day goes by when I don’t learn about yet another outlandish thing going on in my country. Look at the headline for an August 5th article in Blaze Media: “Female inmate now pregnant after California pro-trans policy forces women’s prisons to house biological men despite prisoners’ pleas, warnings….” Yup, California passed a law allowing any male prisoner who “identifies” as female to request a transfer to a women’s prison.

“Female prisoners and women’s advocacy groups pled with the state of California not to implement a new pro-transgender law that would force state prisons to accept biological males. The inmates and their advocates warned Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) and his administration that nothing good could come of it, citing fears of abuse, sexual disease, and pregnancy.

“In response to these concerns, the state … handed out condoms and pregnancy resources.”

© 2021 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 13, 2021 at 6:37 AM

Portraits from our yard: episode 8

with 12 comments

In a comment on an earlier post showing a Turk’s cap flower (Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii) in our yard on July 15th, Gallivanta asked whether the characteristic long central column is always upright. The fact is that while most of those columns do grow straight, some curve and some eventually fall off or get broken off. Today’s post shows you those two situations.


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There’s no “official” name for the beliefs that constitute a large part of current leftist ideology. Some people use the term “wokeism,” others “illiberalism,” and still others “critical race theory” (CRT). By whatever name you care to call that ideology, the American educational establishment is increasingly pushing it into our public schools. When opponents of that indoctrination call out the educational establishment for their illiberal beliefs and practices, some of the people in charge have resorted to the sophistic defense that what they’re promoting is not CRT. That’s what the head of the second-largest teachers union, the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), did on July 6th: “Let’s be clear: Critical race theory is not taught in elementary schools or high schools. It’s a method of examination taught in law school and college that helps analyze whether systemic racism exists.” But as Shakespeare reminded us in Hamlet: “The lady doth protest too much, methinks.” The lady in question is named Weingarten.

Shakespeare also wrote, this time in Romeo and Juliet: “That which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet”—only in this case, that which teachers unions refuse to call critical race theory, by any other name would be as foul. When we consider recent utterances by people in the teachers unions, as well as recent documents they’ve produced, it’s clear that they are pushing transgressive beliefs. (You’re welcome to read a student’s confirmation.) The largest American teachers union is the National Education Association (NEA). Look at this New Business Item from the period June 30–July 3, 2021:

The NEA will, with guidance on implementation from the NEA president and chairs of the Ethnic Minority Affairs Caucuses:

A. Share and publicize, through existing channels, information already available on critical race theory (CRT) — what it is and what it is not; have a team of staffers for members who want to learn more and fight back against anti-CRT rhetoric; and share information with other NEA members as well as their community members.

B. Provide an already-created, in-depth, study that critiques empire, white supremacy, anti-Blackness, anti-Indigeneity, racism, patriarchy, cisheteropatriarchy, capitalism, ableism, anthropocentrism, and other forms of power and oppression at the intersections of our society, and that we oppose attempts to ban critical race theory and/or The 1619 Project.

Aside from the jargony crock pot of crackpot shibboleths enumerated in the last paragraph, notice the irony in the largest teachers union wanting to “fight back against anti-CRT” and to “oppose attempts to ban critical race theory”—the very thing they claim they’re not teaching!

© 2021 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 9, 2021 at 4:43 AM

Portraits from our yard: episode 6

with 41 comments

From July 22nd comes this portrait of Pavonia lasiopetala, known as rock rose, rose pavonia, and pavonia mallow (as its prominent stamen column confirms membership in the mallow family). This is yet another portrait in which the use of flash caused the sky to come out darker than it actually was. I like that look, even if it’s not true to life, and I hope you find it attractive, too.


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You may have noticed that we’re in the midst of a once-in-a-century pandemic. With continuing vaccinations, rising percents of the population in the United States and other countries have gained effective protection from the coronavirus. That’s good news. At the same time, the delta variant of the virus, which seemingly spreads more easily than the original strain and apparently affects more young people than before, has been infecting increasingly many people around the world. Sydney, Australia, for example, has had to return to lockdowns. Some places in the United States are now seeing their cases approaching the peak numbers of last winter.

So what is the current American administration doing during this resurgence of the pandemic? It’s illegally letting people come across our southern border as fast as it can and either turning many of them loose in border towns or paying to send them by bus or plane farther into our country. The number of people the government is illegally letting in is so large—on the order of 40,000 every single week—and border officials are so overworked trying to deal with the massive influx, that there’s no way to test all the people for Covid-19. Of those that have been checked, some have indeed tested positive for the virus. Statistically speaking, that means authorities have to be illegally letting in some Covid-positive people and turning them loose inside our country. Nice going, federal government!

Aside from the insanity of illegally letting in a million people every six months during a rising pandemic, the illegal entrants who aren’t carrying Covid-19 still present a huge burden for the towns where the government is dumping them, often with no notification to local authorities. Two days ago in the Texas border town of Laredo, which is 95% Hispanic, “Mayor Pete Saenz signed [a] disaster declaration and refiled a request to stop the transportation of migrants from the [Rio Grande] Valley to their city in an ongoing lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security.” In another Texas border town, “the City Commission also instructed City staff to demand relief from the federal government for the alarming number of immigrants that are being released into the city of McAllen,” which is about 85% Hispanic. Nice going, federal government!

UPDATE: After this post “went to press,” I learned about two whistleblowers who “have accused members of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) of directing them to minimize the size of a coronavirus outbreak among migrant children housed in detention facilities.” You’ll find more about that, including a link to the official complaint, in an article by Hank Berrien.

© 2021 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 6, 2021 at 4:38 AM

Posted in nature photography

Tagged with , , , ,

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