Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘pink

The other wildflower I hadn’t seen in years

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The other wildflower I encountered on June 12th along a clifftop trail above the Colorado River on the west side of the Capital of Texas Highway after not having seen the species for years was Acourtia runcinata, known as peonia and stemless perezia. No one could fault you for adding the name ribbonflower or bowflower. As happened minutes earlier with the Texas milkweed, this wildflower grew in a tree-shaded area and yet a shaft of sunshine coming through the canopy provided the dramatic spotlight I needed at the time.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 14, 2019 at 4:47 AM

Urban expresswayside wildflowers

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Click to enlarge.

On March 29th, while driving to see a visiting classmate from graduate school decades ago, I came to the intersection of US 183 and N. Lamar Blvd. To my right, on an island of ground in the midst of a whole lot of pavement, I noticed some tall gaura plants flowering alongside a bunch of bluebonnets. I assume the highway people sowed seeds there but I don’t actually know. The next morning I went back with my camera equipment to see what I could do. The sun had climbed a little above the elevated expressway but clouds kept moving across the sun, so the wildflowers mostly remained lit with indirect light. That led to the pleasant portrait you see here of two interlocked gaura stalks.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 3, 2019 at 4:34 AM

Pink evening primrose colony

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On the afternoon of March 27th we were beginning our long trek home from Floresville on US 181 when I noticed a colony of pink evening primroses (Oenothera speciosa) in the fringe between the highway and the parking lot of a CVS Pharmacy. There was no help for it but to turn around at the first opportunity and go back to take pictures of the wildflowers. Beyond the pink evening primroses you can see a few phlox flowers and Indian paintbrushes.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 31, 2019 at 4:39 AM

Discovering a new place by looking at a map

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We wanted to go out walking on February 24th so I pulled up a local map on my computer screen to pick a place. As I scrolled around on the map I noticed Mills Pond in the Wells Branch community some nine miles northeast of our house. After 42 years in Austin I’d never heard of Mills Pond, even though I’ve photographed places close to it. That alone was a good reason to check it out. Here are four pictures from our visit.

A few trees were beginning to green out along the pond’s shore.

A very different color drew attention to this redbud tree (Cercis canadensis).

Look at the trees reflected in the creek leading to the lake.

Focusing on the breeze-rippled surface of the creek rather than on the tree reflections gave a different effect.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 6, 2019 at 4:37 AM

Ant on pavonia mallow

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We have several pavonia mallow plants (Pavonia lasiopetala) in our yard, but I’ve never managed to get as good a portrait of one from behind as when I went walking through the Taylor Draper entrance to Great Hills Park on October 10th. The backlighting brought out patterns not apparent in a conventional view, as you can confirm by comparing a picture from 2012.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 17, 2018 at 4:44 AM

Playoffs

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Even if you’ve been coming to this website for only a while you’ve probably noticed that I’m fond of playing off a subject of one color against a background of another. (In fact it’s #5 in About My Techniques.) With that in mind, here from the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center on September 26th are two takes on a combination of wildflowers you’ve seen separately in the last two posts: showy palafoxia, Palafoxia hookeriana, and prairie goldenrod, Solidago nemoralis.

And in a different sort of playoff that’s minus the goldenrod, below you’ll find a pair of showy palafoxia seed heads in front of some fresh flower heads. The spider’s white lair is a bonus.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 10, 2018 at 4:44 AM

Pink and yellow thrills a fellow; pink and blue is pretty too.

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Palafoxia callosa goes by the common name small palafoxia because at half an inch in diameter its flower heads are indeed smaller than those of other species in the genus. The background in the first photograph owes its yellow to cowpen daisies, a few of which you’ve already seen from the same September 2nd session along Lost Horizon Dr. in my Great Hills neighborhood.

Back on August 24th along the right-of-way beneath the power lines west of Morado Circle I portrayed a small palafoxia from the side so that the blue sky could be the background, as you see in the picture below. The heads in this non-composite composite species consist entirely of disk flowers; there are no ray flowers.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

September 24, 2018 at 5:44 PM

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