Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘pink

Not everything is pristine. In fact, very little is.

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As an example of the thought in the title, take these two pink evening primrose flowers, Oenothera speciosa, that I photographed near Yaupon Dr. in my extended neighborhood on April 1st. If that’s too bedraggled for your taste, I’ll relent and balance it with a picture of a pink evening primrose flower that remained mostly pristine even in the stiff breeze on the Blackland Prairie in Round Rock seven days later. So windy was it that I set the camera’s shutter at 1/800 of a second in hopes of stopping the flower’s movements. You’ll recognize that the background color comes from the colony of bluebonnets, Lupinus texensis, that the pink evening primrose had managed to find a roothold in.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 21, 2018 at 4:44 AM

Southern dewberry flower and opening bud

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Rubus trivialis; Great Hills Park; March 29. If crinkles are your thing, this flower’s for you.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 7, 2018 at 4:47 AM

Pink and blue

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Did you know that as recently as the first part of the 20th century people in the United States took pink to be the appropriate color for boys and blue the appropriate color for girls?

For aeons before then, firm against all sociological winds, the pink flowers of the Mexican buckeye tree (Ungnadia speciosa) had been standing out against blue skies on sunny days. They’ve kept doing so since then, as they did on March 14th at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, and they’ll keep on doing so for aeons to come.

In contrast, or you might say un-contrast, here’s a picture of Mexican buckeye flowers on the same tree but with no blue showing at all:

UPDATE. When I did exact Google searches for “against all sociological winds” and “against sociological winds” I got no hits, but I did get 160 hits for “sociological winds.”

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 29, 2018 at 4:49 AM

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It’s spring

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Redbud tree (Cercis canadensis) in north-central Austin yesterday.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 14, 2018 at 4:40 AM

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New Zealand: sunset over Franz Josef Glacier

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Late in the afternoon a year ago today we checked into the Glacier View Motel outside the village of Franz Josef Glacier on the west side of New Zealand’s South Island. The motel lived up to its name, as you can confirm in this view that I recorded at sundown.

(“Monday mountains 8” is an alternate title for this post.)

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

February 19, 2018 at 4:25 AM

Sunday sunset 4

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On each of the four Sundays in January you’ve seen sunset pictures from the state whose license plates proclaim it the Land of Enchantment. Now that today’s post concludes the series, you’re welcome to look back at the other photographs that have appeared here from June 10, 2017, at Camel Rock, 11 miles north of downtown Santa Fe.

Because the first Sunday sunset picture this month appeared on January 7, and because there are 7 days in a week, all of the January pictures in this sequence came on dates divisible by 7:  7, 14, 21, 28. Speaking of divisibility, if you divide 1 by 7, and then 2 by 7, etc., to convert the fractions to decimals, you’ll find that the sevenths give the following infinitely repeating six-digit cycles:

Do you see the cyclical nature of those decimal expansions, with each one consisting of the same digits in the same order, only starting at a different place in the cycle?

But wait! The columns want some attention, too. Notice that reading down the first column of decimal digits is the same as reading up the fourth column? Likewise for the second and fifth columns, and also for the third and sixth columns.

There’s more that could be said, but for now I’ll let the sun set on these mathematical pleasures and not take you further into seventh heaven.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 28, 2018 at 4:58 AM

Camel Rock

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Here’s a view from June 10th showing Camel Rock, a landmark on the main highway some 11 miles north of downtown Santa Fe. When I first visited Camel Rock nearly half a century ago, anyone could walk up to it and even onto it. Now I found the structure ringed by a fence. While I appreciate the protection, the fence made it hard to take pictures because I couldn’t get close enough to stand or sit where I wanted to. Oh well, I did what I could, aided by one of those famous New Mexico sunsets.

Do you see the rocky outline of the camel, complete with a hoodoo for a head and neck? If you’d like a look back at other pareidolic images that have appeared here in 2016 and 2017, click “pareidolia” in the “Tagged with” section at the bottom of this post and scroll down through the results. (There are bound to be instances in older posts as well, but I learned the term pareidolia only last year.)

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 2, 2017 at 4:42 AM

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