Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘pink

Camel Rock

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Here’s a view from June 10th showing Camel Rock, a landmark on the main highway some 11 miles north of downtown Santa Fe. When I first visited Camel Rock nearly half a century ago, anyone could walk up to it and even onto it. Now I found the structure ringed by a fence. While I appreciate the protection, the fence made it hard to take pictures because I couldn’t get close enough to stand or sit where I wanted to. Oh well, I did what I could, aided by one of those famous New Mexico sunsets.

Do you see the rocky outline of the camel, complete with a hoodoo for a head and neck? If you’d like a look back at other pareidolic images that have appeared here in 2016 and 2017, click “pareidolia” in the “Tagged with” section at the bottom of this post and scroll down through the results. (There are bound to be instances in older posts as well, but I learned the term pareidolia only last year.)

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 2, 2017 at 4:42 AM

Rocky Mountain beeweed

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As if to corroborate the common name Rocky mountain beeweed, I found a native bee on these flowers of Cleome serrulata at Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monument in northern New Mexico on June 12th. An online article about this species notes that other vernacular names for the plant are stinking-clover, bee spider-flower, skunk weed, Navajo spinach, and guaco. This wildflower is a relative of the clammyweed that grows in Austin.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 20, 2017 at 4:50 AM

Six minutes later

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I’m sending out this post six minutes after the previous one to show you how the clouds looked six minutes later above Morrison, Colorado, on June 4th. I took this follow-up picture at 8:34 PM Mountain Daylight Saving Time.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 4, 2017 at 4:50 AM

Just after sundown on June 4th

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Just after the sun had gone down on June 4th behind the mountains to the west of Morrison, Colorado, I hurried to find a place where I could pull over and photograph this colorful blimp of a cloud.* The time was 8:28 PM Mountain Daylight Saving Time.

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* I originally wrote “this colorful cloud zeppelin.” Then I changed it to “this colorful cloud blimp.” Later I wondered if it should be “this colorful blimp cloud.” Finally I hit upon the happy solution “this colorful blimp of a cloud.” Now if I could just figure out how many angels can dance on the head of a pin….

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 4, 2017 at 4:44 AM

Yellow before pink

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While several of the mountain pinks along Capital of Texas Highway on June 19th were white, most of the plants had flowers of their usual color. A few were vibrant, including the ones shown here that I used as the middle ground against which to play off this square-bud primrose flower, Calylophus berlandieri. The stigma in these flowers can be yellow, as here, or black, as I showed a couple of years ago.

UPDATE: the latest botanical classification for the square-bud primrose is Oenothera capillifolia subsp. capillifolia.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

June 29, 2017 at 4:54 AM

What f/2.8 will get you

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A large aperture of f/2.8 will get you a soft portrait like this one of a rain-lily bud (Cooperia pedunculata) on Floral Park Dr. in my neighborhood on April 1st.

I threw away many of the pictures I took of this bud because I hadn’t managed to get enough in focus to please me. In this frame I was surprised that I got good focus not only on the nearest surface of the bud but also on the tip of the maroon sheath.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 14, 2017 at 5:00 AM

Beginning to be bedraggled

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sensitive-briar-flower-globe-decomposing-1351a

Over the years I’ve photographed pristine flower globes of Mimosa roemeriana, the sensitive briar. On October 7th in my neighborhood I photographed a little pink globe of that kind but also the more bedraggled one you see here. The chaos is visually appealing, don’t you think?

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 13, 2016 at 4:44 AM

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