Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘pink

Smartweed and blue sky

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On August 29th I found plenty of smartweed plants (Polygonum sp.)
flowering on the wet ground at the edge of the Riata Trace Pond in northwest Austin.
I was careless enough to get part of one shoe wet while hunching down to make my portraits.
Still, you needn’t worry about your monitor: I made sure today’s photo was thoroughly dry before posting it.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 31, 2019 at 4:25 AM

Huffman Prairie Pink

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Huffman Prairie looms large in the history of aviation because it’s the place in Dayton, Ohio, where the Wright Brothers improved their early flying machines to the point of being reliably controllable in the air. According to a source that I read during our trip, Huffman Prairie also happens to be the largest native prairie remnant in the state of Ohio today. When we visited on July 21st we found plenty of wildflowers managing to flourish in the glaring summer light and heat. Prominent among them was a colony of echinacea (Echinacea purpurea.)

Here’s what an individual flower head looks like:

And here’s a somewhat bedraggled fasciated double flower head I noticed there:

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 19, 2019 at 4:46 AM

Pink before yellow

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Growing out of the caliche along Capital of Texas Highway on June 18th was this square-bud primrose (Oenothera berlandieri). The complementary color beyond it came from mountain pinks (Zeltnera beyrichii). And now that I’ve mentioned those, I guess I owe you a picture of them in their own right.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 1, 2019 at 4:43 AM

The other wildflower I hadn’t seen in years

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The other wildflower I encountered on June 12th along a clifftop trail above the Colorado River on the west side of the Capital of Texas Highway after not having seen the species for years was Acourtia runcinata, known as peonia and stemless perezia. No one could fault you for adding the name ribbonflower or bowflower. As happened minutes earlier with the Texas milkweed, this wildflower grew in a tree-shaded area and yet a shaft of sunshine coming through the canopy provided the dramatic spotlight I needed at the time.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 14, 2019 at 4:47 AM

Urban expresswayside wildflowers

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Click to enlarge.

On March 29th, while driving to see a visiting classmate from graduate school decades ago, I came to the intersection of US 183 and N. Lamar Blvd. To my right, on an island of ground in the midst of a whole lot of pavement, I noticed some tall gaura plants flowering alongside a bunch of bluebonnets. I assume the highway people sowed seeds there but I don’t actually know. The next morning I went back with my camera equipment to see what I could do. The sun had climbed a little above the elevated expressway but clouds kept moving across the sun, so the wildflowers mostly remained lit with indirect light. That led to the pleasant portrait you see here of two interlocked gaura stalks.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 3, 2019 at 4:34 AM

Pink evening primrose colony

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On the afternoon of March 27th we were beginning our long trek home from Floresville on US 181 when I noticed a colony of pink evening primroses (Oenothera speciosa) in the fringe between the highway and the parking lot of a CVS Pharmacy. There was no help for it but to turn around at the first opportunity and go back to take pictures of the wildflowers. Beyond the pink evening primroses you can see a few phlox flowers and Indian paintbrushes.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 31, 2019 at 4:39 AM

Discovering a new place by looking at a map

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We wanted to go out walking on February 24th so I pulled up a local map on my computer screen to pick a place. As I scrolled around on the map I noticed Mills Pond in the Wells Branch community some nine miles northeast of our house. After 42 years in Austin I’d never heard of Mills Pond, even though I’ve photographed places close to it. That alone was a good reason to check it out. Here are four pictures from our visit.

A few trees were beginning to green out along the pond’s shore.

A very different color drew attention to this redbud tree (Cercis canadensis).

Look at the trees reflected in the creek leading to the lake.

Focusing on the breeze-rippled surface of the creek rather than on the tree reflections gave a different effect.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 6, 2019 at 4:37 AM

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