Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘yellow

Maximilian sunflowers in far north Austin

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On October 12th, four weeks after returning from Alberta, I finally went out onto the prairie side of Austin in search of fall wildflowers. I found them. Maximilian sunflowers (Helianthus maximiliani) seemed to be at their peak. If you could use a blast of yellow today, you’ve got it.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 14, 2017 at 4:51 AM

Meanwhile, from back in Austin, here’s some yellow.

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Here’s some flowering goldenrod (Solidago spp.) on Morado Circle in northwest Austin on September 26th. The nearest flower heads are in focus but in the image as a whole I’ve emphasized color over sharpness, abetted by a rather wide aperture of f/5.6. If that number doesn’t sing to you, as the French say, then listen to the flowers’ chanson instead.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 5, 2017 at 4:54 AM

Soar, sunflower, soar

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Helianthus annuus. Cedar Park, Texas. June 22.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 10, 2017 at 3:34 AM

The colorful Badlands

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Okay, so I’ve been holding out on you when it comes to the best color I saw in the Badlands of South Dakota on May 31st.

Well-travelled Austin photographer Rick Capozza explained the colors to me: “White layers are volcanic ash or tuff as they call it in Big Bend. Tan and gray are sand and gravel. Red and orange are iron oxide deposits, primarily ferric oxide. Purple shale colors represent manganese deposits and yellow layers are ferrous sulfate.”

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 8, 2017 at 4:48 AM

And here’s a look at those Maximilian sunflowers in their own right

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Behold some Helianthus maximiliani along the North Walnut Creek Trail on July 24th. A couple of nearby Maximilian sunflower flower heads played the role of the golden glow behind the bluebell in yesterday’s portrait. I’ll repeat what I mentioned in a comment: I’d already found some Maximilian sunflowers blossoming along this trail on June 21st, a good two months before even the earliest part of their traditional bloom period. Let me add that last year in my neighborhood I found one of these plants flowering on May 5th. Regardless of the season, Maximilian sunflowers always strike me as cheerful.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 26, 2017 at 4:53 AM

What I found yesterday

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Went walking yesterday morning along the North Walnut Creek Trail to see if any bluebells (Eustoma exaltatum ssp. russellianum) had come up where I’d found them last year. Sure enough, a few had, and they were adjacent to some Maximilian sunflowers (Helianthus maximiliani). If you know those sunflowers, you may be surprised at how early they’re blooming. Prepare to be more surprised when I tell you I found some already flowering along this trail on June 21st, a good two months before even the earliest part of their traditional bloom period.

© Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 25, 2017 at 4:55 AM

Yellow before pink

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While several of the mountain pinks along Capital of Texas Highway on June 19th were white, most of the plants had flowers of their usual color. A few were vibrant, including the ones shown here that I used as the middle ground against which to play off this square-bud primrose flower, Calylophus berlandieri. The stigma in these flowers can be yellow, as here, or black, as I showed a couple of years ago.

UPDATE: the latest botanical classification for the square-bud primrose is Oenothera capillifolia subsp. capillifolia.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

June 29, 2017 at 4:54 AM

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