Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘yellow

Bright autumn yellow

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What would fall in Austin be without the bright yellow flower spikes of Helianthus maximiliani, the Maximilian sunflower? This October 19th view is from the walk in Pease Park I mentioned last time.

On November 11th at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center I got in closer for a more-abstract portrait:

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 23, 2019 at 4:41 AM

Flowering goldenrod colony

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Cumulus clouds enhanced this get-on-the-ground-and-aim-upward view of a flowering goldenrod colony (probably Solidago altissima) at Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge near the Gulf of Mexico on October 7th:

A higher vantage point from farther back shows how densely expansive the flowering goldenrod colony was:

Despite the overnight freeze in Austin this morning, the few isolated goldenrods in my neighborhood whose flowers I’ve been observing look as good and fresh as before the freeze. Hardy plants, these goldenrods.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 12, 2019 at 4:25 PM

Artist Boat Coastal Heritage Preserve

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On October 6, after time at the Kelly Hamby Nature Trail, we went over to the Artist Boat Coastal Heritage Preserve. Linda had told us to expect to see Solidago odora, called fragrant goldenrod, sweet goldenrod, and anise-scented goldenrod. My nose and brain detected a vinegary scent.

Close to the goldenrod was some croton, Croton sp.

On one of the croton leaves a tiny fly caught my attention. UPDATE: the good folks at bugguide.net have placed the fly in the genus Condylostylus, adding that it may be a female Condylostylus mundus.

Another find was some flowers of Vigna luteola, known as hairypod cowpea, wild cowpea, and yellow vigna.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 26, 2019 at 6:17 AM

Yellow beneath the pines

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As part of the Native Plant Society of Texas’s annual symposium in League City, on October 4th I joined a field trip to a property in Galveston County managed by the Marathon Oil Company. There I found some seaside goldenrod, Solidago sempervirens, whose buds were opening. Parallel rows of pine trees in the background formed a convenient frame. Well, actually not so convenient, as I had to get down and contort myself to line up the goldenrod properly while struggling to keep everything vertical.

Also growing near the pines were some swamp sunflowers, Helianthus angustifolius:

How about an artsier portrait that shows a swamp sunflower bud beginning to open?

Neither of these species grows in Austin, so both were new to me.
Here’s one of the goldenrods that a pine needle cluster had fallen onto:

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 14, 2019 at 4:47 AM

Grindelia papposa

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On this date in 2006 I spent some time on the flower mound in Flower Mound, near Dallas. One species I photographed there was Grindelia papposa, apparently known in various places as Spanish gold, saw-leaf daisy, wax goldenweed, and clasping-leaved Haplopappus; to me it was another species of gumweed. If your eyes zoomed in on the upper flower heads, you’ll have noticed the curled ribbons effect (not to be confused with the Ken Burns effect) that I saw again on the flower mound 13 years later in a different member of the sunflower family.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 4, 2019 at 4:39 AM

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Goldenrod at Lucifer Falls

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As we drove around the Northeast in the second half of July and the first week of August, we were surprised to see goldenrod (Solidago sp.) already flowering abundantly in many places. One of those was at Lucifer Falls in New York’s Treman State Park on August 1st. That was seven weeks ago; I’ve yet to see any goldenrod flowering in Austin, though I’ve read reports online of people beginning to see some here.

And while we’re still talking about Treman State Park,
let me show you one more picture of the picturesque rock strata there:

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

September 22, 2019 at 4:47 AM

Engelmann daisy in two stages

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The Engelmann daisy, Engelmannia peristenia, could as well be called a ribbon daisy, given the strong propensity of its ray flowers to curl under like ribbons. Notice also the way the little crown of ray flowers typically looks pinched as a bud opens. The curling and pinching took place on the flower mound in Flower Mound on June 9th.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 12, 2019 at 4:44 AM

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