Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘tree

New Zealand: kauri bark

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You’ve already seen a picture from February 12 showing Tāne Mahuta, the largest known extant kauri tree, Agathis australis. Three days later we visited the Manginangina Kauri Reserve northwest of Kerikeri. In spite of intermittent rain, we walked the [p]reserve’s path, where I made various pictures, including this abstract portrait of kauri bark.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 2, 2017 at 5:01 AM

New Zealand: kohurangi

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You can find old pictures of people with outstretched arms encircling the base of Tāne Mahuta but that’s no longer possible. Out of concern that the roots were getting trampled, the tree’s caretakers have planted vegetation around it to act as a shield (and also to restore native species to the area). Here in front of Tāne Mahuta you see the flowers of what the Māori call kohurangi and English speakers know as a tree daisy; botanists have yet another name, Brachyglottis kirkii.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 15, 2017 at 4:52 AM

New Zealand: Tāne Mahuta

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On a cloudy February 12th we visited Tāne Mahuta, about which Wikipedia says: “Tāne Mahuta is a giant kauri tree (Agathis australis) in the Waipoua Forest of Northland Region, New Zealand. Its age is unknown but is estimated to be between 1,250 and 2,500 years. It is the largest kauri known to stand today. Its Māori name means ‘Lord of the Forest’ (see Tāne), from the name of a god in the Māori pantheon.” If you’d like, you can read the rest of the article, which includes measurements.

The kauri trees in New Zealand suffered a fate similar to that of the sequoias and giant redwoods in California: in the 1800s and 1900s most got cut down for their wood.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 14, 2017 at 5:00 AM

Corrugated redwood tree

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Look at this strangely corrugated trunk of a California redwood tree (Sequoia sempervirens) that I saw on October 31 of last year in Big Basin Redwoods State Park.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

February 23, 2017 at 5:12 AM

Arizona sycamore

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While visiting Montezuma Castle on October 18th last year I learned that there’s such a thing as an Arizona sycamore tree, Platanus wrightii. Like the better-known American sycamore, Platanus occidentalis, this one has bark that peels to reveal trunk and branches that shine white in the light of the sun, especially from a distance. A closer look, like the one below, reveals patterns and details.

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Click to enlarge.


I’m still halfway around the world. You’re welcome to comment but I may be slow to reply. I’m sorry I also haven’t been able to keep up with your blogs.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

February 20, 2017 at 5:12 AM

Posted in nature photography

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Finally a redwood

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After teasing you here with pictures from redwood preserves, first the Armstrong Grove and then Muir Woods, I’m finally providing a clear shot of a California redwood tree, Sequoia sempervirens, from Big Basin Redwoods State Park on October 31. This species produces the tallest trees in the world, even if in today’s photo you’re looking only at the base of one. I was attracted by the way the orange patches on the redwood’s trunk, along with the dry redwood leaves fallen on the ground, contrasted not only with the green of the moss on the tree but also and even more so with the greater greenery of the forest beyond.

Click below to zoom in on the orange area.

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© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 20, 2017 at 4:40 AM

Colors above, colors below

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Welcome to a tree that’s native in central Texas but that has never appeared in these pages till now: Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii, known as western soapberry. I couldn’t help noticing this one turning colors on the afternoon of November 30, 2016, outside the office at Monument Hill State Historic Site in La Grange, some 75 miles southeast of my home in Austin.

It wasn’t only above me that I found fall foliage. Close to the ground I noticed some vine leaves becoming patterned and taking on warm colors. I believe the plants were pearl milkweed vines, Matelea reticulata.

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Click to enlarge.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 9, 2017 at 4:46 AM

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