Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘tree

Intricate roots of a fallen tree

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Glacier National Park, Montana; August 31.

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 15, 2017 at 4:53 AM

Wild Goose Island

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Here’s a non-traditional photograph of Wild Goose Island in St. Mary Lake in Glacier National Park on August 30th. I say it’s non traditional because the island is such a small element compared to the dead tree in the foreground that dominates the image. You could add that the photograph is unconventional because instead of clarity and blue water and snow-covered mountains, you get a smoky wildfire haze that has muted the details. Those same observations apply to the picture of Wild Goose Island below, which I made ten minutes later from another pullover on the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 3, 2017 at 4:48 AM

Bastrop burned tree remains

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Bastrop State Park. August 11. Remains of the horrendous forest fire of 2011.

If you’re interested in the craft of photography, points 3, 14, 18, and 19 in About My Techniques pertain to this picture.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 21, 2017 at 4:48 AM

Flaming flameleaf sumac fruit

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I’ve posted plenty of pictures showing the bright autumn leaves of prairie flameleaf sumac, Rhus lanceolata. On August 11th I was driving up Alum Creek Rd. east of Bastrop when a group of sumacs caught my eye with the sunlight-saturated rich red of their freshly forming fruit clusters against the greenery of the trees’ foliage. I’m not sure which species or Rhus this was, as there are several similar-looking candidates in Bastrop County.

I’d gone out that morning to get acquainted with a new 100–400mm lens, so I used only it on the entire outing. The fruit clusters high up in the sumac trees proved worthy subjects to zoom in on, as you see below.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 15, 2017 at 7:01 AM

Posted in nature photography

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July 4th

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July 4th is my birthday. It always has been. While I could commemorate the date by showing you one picture for each birthday I’ve had, I think you’ll agree that would be too onerous for me and certainly for you. Instead, let me focus on the 4 in today’s date and show you four pictures I took in the southern part of Great Hills Park on June 23rd. The first thing that caught my attention, just beyond the metal railing along the sidewalk on that side of Floral Park Drive, was the dense display of Clematis drummondii flowers. Like pale yellow-green stars in a floral firmament they were.

Then I wandered steeply down to the shaded bank of the creek that flows through that section of the park. The creek had mostly dried up, which is common in the heat of the Texas summer. Some water remained pooled up in one small part of the creek bed, and on the surface of the stagnating pool I saw a dry leaf, apparently that of a mustang grape, Vitis mustangensis. Several grapes had fallen in that area and one of them miraculously lay on top of the little raft that the leaf had become for it. Even when the leaf shifted slightly in its floating, the grape didn’t roll off.

When I finished taking pictures of the de facto raft, I noticed on the far bank of the creek, which lay lit up by lambent sunlight, what I feel compelled to call glaucous glop. Don’t knock it if you haven’t tried it, at least photographically.

After I walked a minute or so downstream from the glaucous glop, I came across a shed snake skin on a mostly dried-out portion of the creek bed. The snake skin had been rent into several parts that remained near one another. The tail end, shown here, lay flattened onto a level portion of the creek bed. A little piece of dry Ashe juniper, Juniperus ashei, conveniently delineated the wider end of that segment.

Following suit, this sentence conveniently delineates the end of my July 4th tetralogy. Except that I’m adding a sentence to say that if you can slip the words lambent, delineate and tetralogy into a conversation today, it’ll be a fine birthday present for a lover of words.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 4, 2017 at 12:01 AM

American Elm Survivor Tree

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We drove up to Oklahoma City on April 19th and learned after we arrived that the date marked the 22nd anniversary of the terrorist bombing there. That afternoon we walked the grounds of the Oklahoma City National Memorial and saw the decorations that had been placed on all the chairs in the Field of Empty Chairs. The next day we visited the indoor museum, and after emerging I photographed an American elm, Ulmus americana, that has come to be known as the Survivor Tree. Heavily damaged, the elm managed to stay alive; it even bloomed the next year and has done so every year since then. You can hear/read more in an NPR interview.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

May 14, 2017 at 4:53 AM

Posted in nature photography

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New Zealand: kauri bark

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You’ve already seen a picture from February 12 showing Tāne Mahuta, the largest known extant kauri tree, Agathis australis. Three days later we visited the Manginangina Kauri Reserve northwest of Kerikeri. In spite of intermittent rain, we walked the [p]reserve’s path, where I made various pictures, including this abstract portrait of kauri bark.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 2, 2017 at 5:01 AM

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