Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘forest

New Zealand: Manginangina

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A year ago today in New Zealand’s Northland we visited the Manginangina Scenic Reserve, which is a good place to see the native bush that once covered much of the country.

Behold the distinctive branches of a young rimu tree (Dacrydium cupressinum):

As a photographer fond of abstractions, I particularly enjoyed the self- and lichen-mottled bark of a kauri tree (Agathis australis).

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

February 15, 2018 at 4:46 AM

Sometimes a negative is positive

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On August 29, 2017, we visited Cameron Lake in Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta. Adjacent to the parking lot I noticed the curiously curved remains of a slender tree trunk that I felt compelled to take several pictures of.

While processing the photograph shown here, I accidentally hit a key combination that inverted the colors. I found the negative image pleasing, unreal though it was. Can you guess what it looks like? Try to imagine it, then click the blank frame below to see the fantasy forest.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 25, 2018 at 4:56 AM

Intricate roots of a fallen tree

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Glacier National Park, Montana; August 31.

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 15, 2017 at 4:53 AM

I like clarity and contrast in my photographs.

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Yes, I usually do like clarity and contrast in my photographs. If what’s in front of me doesn’t lend itself to those qualities, then I go with the toned-down reality that’s available. Here from September 8th along Highway 93 in British Columbia’s Kootenay National Park are two takes—one horizontal, the other vertical—on a formerly burned forest hazily visible through the smoke of the latest fires in the area. Subtlety can be special, too.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 4, 2017 at 5:01 AM

Regeneration

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When I stopped in Glacier National Park on August 30th to photograph the remains of a forest fire from a few years before, I was taken with these seed heads of a grass that had filled in parts of the forest floor since that fire. The dry grass stalks stood immobile that afternoon, yet their leaning and their arcs might prompt your imagination to see movement. The gray skies in the distance need no imagination to be seen for what they were: smoky from the wildfires that became the backdrop for much of our trip.

Sonja Hartmann at the park’s plant nursery identified the photogenic seed heads as Calamagrostis rubescens, known as pinegrass. Above the center of the picture’s lower border are the similarly colored but differently structured seed head remains of yarrow, Achillea millefolium.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 12, 2017 at 4:54 AM

That stream I mentioned

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Oh yeah, here’s the rushing stream I mentioned yesterday, the one we saw on June 5th near the aspen grove along US 40 in the Rocky Mountains. My guess is that some or even a lot of the water was due to melting ice and snow from the surrounding mountains.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 6, 2017 at 4:55 AM

New Zealand: Kahikatea

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The little reserve in central Christchurch known as Riccarton Bush is home to some trees known botanically as Dacrycarpus dacrydioides, in Māori as kahikatea, and in English as white pine. Unlike the many imported species of pine covering so much of New Zealand, this tree is native. In fact, as you can see from the plaque at the end of this post, the kahikatea is the tallest native tree in the country.

The roots of some of the venerable kahikatea trees I saw on March 1st were impressive. Judging from what I’ve found on the Internet, I haven’t been alone in photographing these very ones:

Here’s an informational plaque that stands in Riccarton Bush:

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

June 6, 2017 at 4:59 AM

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