Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘vine

New Zealand: tree fern like a parasol

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Over the two years since our first visit to New Zealand, something I wished I could do again was look up and see the parasol of a tree fern. In the Manginangina Scenic Reserve on February 15, 2017, I was able to do that once more. Note the slender vine insinuating itself down the right side of the picture.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

February 16, 2018 at 4:51 AM

Viny competition

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The previous post featured a flower of Cynanchum racemosum var. unifarium, known as talayote. The plant is a milkweed vine, and its viny nature is clear in the picture above, which shows some talayote twined around the stalk of a Mexican hat, Ratibida columnifera. Also in evidence in the photograph, and likewise looking for a foothold on other plants, is some Clematis drummondii, known as old man’s beard based on its appearance in a later phase.

They say you can’t tell the players without a scorecard, so here it is.

Twining vine: talayote
Linear vine: old man’s beard
Heart-shaped leaves: talayote
Tripartite leaves: old man’s beard
Whitish-green buds: talayote
Darker buds: old man’s beard

Below, also from May 25, 2011, in my northwest Austin neighborhood, is a closer look at talayote grabbing a Mexican hat seed head.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 22, 2017 at 4:47 AM

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Talayote

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An exchange of comments last month with Linda at The Task at Hand brought up a milkweed vine classified as Cynanchum racemosum. The vernacular name is the four-syllable talayote, the form in which Spanish borrowed an indigenous word for the plant. Talayote rang a bell, so I searched my archive and discovered that the one time I ever found the species was May 25th, 2011, and right in my neighborhood. That was a couple of weeks before this blog started up, and with a world of native plants to highlight in the ensuing posts, I lost sight of talayote. Here then, six-and-a-half years late, is a photograph of a talayote flower. Notice once again that milkweeds do things in fives.

While I never showed talayote here till now, I did feature a different Cynanchum species in 2013.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 21, 2017 at 4:42 AM

Speaking of poison ivy

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The previous post, which showed a lush Virginia creeper vine (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) with richly red leaves, engendered a few comments about poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans). That’s understandable because some or perhaps many people confuse the two vines, even though Virginia creeper normally has five leaflets and poison ivy three (but check out a post from 2015 showing a rare exception).

So far in 2017 I’ve come across several instances of poison ivy turning colors and have taken a few pictures, none of which rival my best ones because the plants themselves this season haven’t been as attractive as in certain other years. For that reason I’ve chosen to show you a photograph from November 27, 2006, when I went to north-central Austin’s Allen Park and found stands of poison ivy that remain the most colorful I’ve ever seen.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 18, 2017 at 4:45 AM

Virginia creeper creeping colorfully upward

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Long-time readers have heard me say, and central Texans don’t need me to tell them, that this area doesn’t have a lot of appealing fall foliage. One exception is Parthenocissus quinquefolia, a climbing vine known as Virginia creeper or, to keep the glory from going to another state, five-leaf creeper. On December 1st I was driving south on US 183 in Cedar Park, an adjacent suburb north of Austin, when I glimpsed a vertical band of red ahead and to my right. I knew right away that it had to be Virginia creeper, and I made sure to stop and photograph this unusually good display of it.

As is almost always the case along a main road in a populated area, I had to work at getting myself into positions—typically low ones—where I could exclude poles, power lines, stores, signs, vehicles, non-native trees, and other unwanted things from my pictures.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 16, 2017 at 4:49 PM

White

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Only once every so many years does Austin get a little snow. The night from December 7th into December 8th was one of those onces. Yesterday morning I headed down to Great Hills Park, thinking the frostweed plants (Verbesina virginica) at the edge of the woods on the south side of Floral Park Dr. might have done their ice trick. They hadn’t. Nevertheless, their large leaves were appealingly covered with snow, and so were the narrower leaves of the inland sea oats (Chasmanthium latifolium) that formed a colony around the frostweed.

Clematis drummondi, a vine that has no qualms about covering other plants, found itself covered for a change.

Not everything appeared so subdued in color. The fruits of the yaupon tree (Ilex vomitoria) were hard to miss.

I made my first picture at 7:25. By around 9:00, the sun had gotten high enough in a clear sky that warming patches of light increasingly reached the snow.

Within a few hours, all but the most recondite snow had melted.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 9, 2017 at 4:42 AM

How could I show you one without the other?

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That is, show you pearl milkweed flowers (Matelea reticulata) without also showing you one of the vine’s pods. By June 22nd this one had already split open and was beginning to release its seeds, each attached to a bit of aeronautical fluff. I followed suit and attached not fluff but a flash to my camera because the area wasn’t bright enough for me to get all the important details in focus without an extra helping of light.

By the way, the shiny fibers attached to the seeds explain why an alternate name for milkweed is silkweed.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 13, 2017 at 4:48 AM

Posted in nature photography

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