Portraits of Wildflowers

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Posts Tagged ‘Treman State Park

Other waterfalls at Treman State Park

with 27 comments

While Lucifer Falls is the best known waterfall in the upper part of Treman State Park, others there also deserve attention. In the first photograph, though no direct sunlight had yet reached these falls on the morning of August 1st, reflected light from near by added yellow to the pool at the base of the waterfall. In some of my photographs I zoomed in to minimize or exclude that trespassing sunlight:

Here’s a different waterfall altogether, the most channelized I saw there:

And here’s a downward and more abstract view of a waterfall:

I used a shutter speed of 1/800 of a second for the third photograph and 1/1000 for the others.
Speedy me, or at least speedy my camera’s shutter.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

September 8, 2019 at 4:51 AM

Lucifer Falls

with 45 comments

I can’t remember if I’d ever heard of Robert H. Treman State Park in the southern part of New York State’s Finger Lakes region before I did research for our summer trip. When we visited on the morning of August 1st I concentrated on the upper (western) end of the park and skipped the lower part, given that we were expected down near New York City later in the day. At Treman we encountered other hikers, but nothing like the crowds we’d run into at Letchworth State Park and Watkins Glen State Park.

The main attraction in the upper section of Treman State Park is the 115-feet-tall Lucifer Falls, shown above as I photographed it at 1/2500 of a second and a focal length of 85mm. Then I switched to my telephoto and zoomed to the maximum 400mm to record details in the falling and splashing water, again at 1/2500 of a second. Notice how sunlight refracting through the spray created pleasing pastel colors. You can use the slightly curved light-colored “bar” in the lower right corner of the second picture to match up to the same feature about a fifth of the way up from the center of the bottom in the first picture.

I also used the maximum 400mm reach of my telephoto to portray a closed lily (perhaps a Canada lily, Lilium canadense) that I noticed leaning out into the gorge. I chose a position that let me line up the lily with the waterfall; apparently the flower reflected a lot more light than the farther-away falls, given the way that the water turned into what looks like a faint cloud floating in darkness.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 26, 2019 at 4:41 AM

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