Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘strata

Keeping and not keeping to the unstraight and narrow

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Here are a couple of pictures from July 30th showing how narrow and sinuous some parts of the gorge are at Watkins Glen State Park in New York’s Finger Lakes region.

In other places the gorge widens and its high walls curve more broadly:

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

September 4, 2019 at 4:39 AM

(WF) cubed + G cubed

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Today’s title is a coded description of the land that is upstate New York: WonderFully Well-Formed WaterFalls and Gorgeous Gorges Galore. In fact the pictures from those kinds of places make up the majority of all the ones I took on the trip. Rather than going in chronological order, which would mean that for a time you’d see post after post with the same types of photographs, I’ll maintain variety by interspersing* gorge and waterfall pictures from New York State with those of other subjects in other places.

Although I grew up on Long Island and visited various sites upstate during my childhood and later on, somehow until July 27th of this year I’d never made it to Letchworth State Park, which bills its Genesee River gorges as the Grand Canyon of the East. Having been to the Grand Canyon of the West, I find the claim a bit of a stretch. Still, there’s no denying that Letchworth is a worthy place to visit. It’s home to three large and impressive waterfalls that truthfully go by the names Lower, Middle, and Upper, along with dozens of smaller falls. Today’s pictures come from the vicinity of the Lower Falls, which we saw first.


How about the strata in the walls of those rocky gorges?

The angularity of some structures made me think I was looking at the ruins of ancient buildings.
And as always, some plants find rootholds in seemingly unlikely places.

Look how wide the Lower Falls are. I wanted to shoot from further left but I haven’t learned how to fly.

* In current English we can intersperse and disperse and even asperse but we can’t just sperse; in early modern English sperse was a synonym of disperse.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 17, 2019 at 4:43 AM

Just tens of meters away

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Just tens of meters away from the famous hoodoos located a few miles east of Drumheller, Alberta, are these that get less attention but are highly photo-worthy. On September 12th I obliged them with my attention and they repaid me with multiple pictures. In this one, notice the dark strata in the foreground, in the farther hills, and even across the middle of the lighter formations.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 19, 2017 at 4:59 PM

Horse Thief Canyon

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Don’t confuse Horse Thief Canyon with Horseshoe Canyon. Both are a bit west of Drumheller, and both are part of the Alberta Badlands. I photographed Horse Thief Canyon from its rim on August 26th, as shown above.

On September 12th we went back with the intention of walking into the canyon. We got about a third of the way down when the trail abruptly ended and we couldn’t find a safe way to go any further. Below, from part-way into the canyon, is a view that includes a few hoodoos.

Not everything down there was so dry and badlands-y. Take these aspen trees, for example:

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 6, 2017 at 4:47 AM

A balanced look at Kasha-Katuwe

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Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks in northern New Mexico is such an intriguing place that I feel I owe you another look at it from our June 12th visit. In particular, the place is known for its many balanced rocks, as shown above and then a little more closely below at a different location. The undulating strata of the rocks have a charm of their own as well.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

 

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 17, 2017 at 5:00 AM

The colorful Badlands

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Okay, so I’ve been holding out on you when it comes to the best color I saw in the Badlands of South Dakota on May 31st.

Well-travelled Austin photographer Rick Capozza explained the colors to me: “White layers are volcanic ash or tuff as they call it in Big Bend. Tan and gray are sand and gravel. Red and orange are iron oxide deposits, primarily ferric oxide. Purple shale colors represent manganese deposits and yellow layers are ferrous sulfate.”

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 8, 2017 at 4:48 AM

Six years

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Six years ago today I uploaded the first post of now almost 2300 in Portraits of Wildflowers. You might say that tentative entry was like the little fern shown above getting a foothold in the vertical strata along the trail we trekked to New Zealand’s Franz Josef Glacier on February 20th this year.

Those strata, which hadn’t always gotten turned 90°, proved so visually appealing that I took many photographs of them. Below is another one. The pink in both cases is from small lichens. Call these formations waterfalls in stone and you’ll have come up with an apt metaphor.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

June 4, 2017 at 4:53 AM

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