Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘spring

Huisache daisy colony

with 30 comments

Along Priest Rd. off S. Loop 1604 southwest of Elmendorf on March 27th we found this extraordinary colony of huisache daisies, Amblyolepis setigera. According to Garden Style San Antonio, “Huisache daisy is so called because it often grows in thick stands under huisache and other chaparral bushes, forming a solid blanket of gold.” Often isn’t always, and in this case I don’t recall a huisache tree anywhere in sight. In the United States these daisies grow only in Texas; they’re also found in Mexico. Mixed in with the huisache daisies in this stand you’ll notice some verbenas, and in the background the ubiquitous Indian paintbrushes, Castilleja indivisa.

The huisache daisy has appeared only once before in these pages, in a closeup with a tumbling flower beetle.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Advertisements

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 6, 2019 at 4:47 AM

Also tall and slender

with 38 comments

 

Echoing the gaura that grew tall and slender
at the southwest corner of US 183 and N. Lamar Blvd. on
March 30 was the greenthread (Thelesperma filifolium)
shown here. I’d been seeing this species flowering
in various places around Austin since January but hadn’t
photographed any. The unusually long stalk gave me
a good reason to break my greenthread photo fast.
Below is a view of the flower head from the other side.
Notice that greenthread shades a little toward orange.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 5, 2019 at 4:45 AM

Floresville City Cemetery #2

with 58 comments

The fourth wildflower-covered burial ground we visited last month was the Floresville City Cemetery #2. Below you’ll see how it looked on March 27th. The red flowers are Indian paintbrushes, Castilleja indivisa, and the yellow are Nueces coreopsis, Coreopsis nuecensis. The white daisies may be in the genus Aphanostephus.

In the second photograph you can pick out several cream-colored paintbrushes. They’re not a different species, just a normal variant that springs up from time to time. Notice the misspelling of Floresville on James Gray’s tombstone. The flowers themselves are not misspelled. (UPDATE: I’ve found out a little more about the James Gray featured in the second picture.)

In some places sandyland bluebonnets (Lupinus subcarnosus) entered the mix.

Different color combinations prevailed in different places.

© Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 4, 2019 at 4:37 AM

Not an April Fool’s joke

with 47 comments

The color of the phlox (Phlox spp.) we saw on March 27th in various places southeast of San Antonio really was as vibrant as shown here. (Contrast that with the normal colors of the foliage.) You’re looking slightly uphill at one part of the large wildflower meadow in the V between FM 775 and FM 321 not far outside the town of La Vernia. By getting low to the ground I took advantage of the slope to conceal two buildings and leave nothing but wildflowers, trees, sky, and clouds showing.

When I faced in the opposite direction, toward the sun, I photographed the phlox colony sloping gently down into at least as dense a colony of Indian paintbrushes (Castilleja indivisa) that looked more orange than usual. The blue flowers interspersed in both colonies were sandyland bluebonnets (Lupinus subcarnosus).

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 1, 2019 at 4:33 AM

Pink evening primrose colony

with 20 comments

On the afternoon of March 27th we were beginning our long trek home from Floresville on US 181 when I noticed a colony of pink evening primroses (Oenothera speciosa) in the fringe between the highway and the parking lot of a CVS Pharmacy. There was no help for it but to turn around at the first opportunity and go back to take pictures of the wildflowers. Beyond the pink evening primroses you can see a few phlox flowers and Indian paintbrushes.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 31, 2019 at 4:39 AM

Large buttercup flower and bud

with 15 comments

Above is the flower of a large buttercup (Ranunculus macranthus) along TX 123 south of Seguin on March 18th. Below is a bud of the same fuzzy species.

Both compositions share a sweep toward the top right, but while the first view is bright and looks upward, the second is darker and looks downward.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 30, 2019 at 4:47 AM

A long yellow flower mound

with 60 comments

From March 21st along FM 1470 northeast of Poteet here’s a long mound of evening primrose flowers. I used a telephoto lens because the land was fenced, which also meant I couldn’t get close enough to even try to identify what species of Oenothera this was. The red flowers were Indian paintbrushes, Castilleja indivisa, and the others were sandyland bluebonnets, Lupinus subcarnosus.

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 29, 2019 at 6:07 AM

%d bloggers like this: