Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘orange

Relentless, relenting

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All that gorgeously relentless yellow you saw last time in a field of Maximilian sunflowers (Helianthus maximiliani) in far north Austin on October 12th has led me to relent and give you this much closer view of a monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) that I photographed there that day.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 11, 2017 at 5:02 AM

Ochre

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(Here’s a pumpkin-colored post for Halloween.)

Wikipedia says of ochre (or ocher) that it “is a natural clay earth pigment which is a mixture of ferric oxide and varying amounts of clay and sand. It ranges in colour from yellow to deep orange or brown. It is also the name of the colours produced by this pigment, especially a light brownish-yellow. A variant of ochre containing a large amount of hematite, or dehydrated iron oxide, has a reddish tint known as “red ochre” (or, in some dialects, ruddle).”

On September 8th in British Columbia’s Kootenay National Park we got our biggest dose ever of ochre when we visited the area known as the Paint Pots. We followed in the steps of native peoples and Anglo settlers, as you can read on the national park’s website. While world travelers may see merely mediocre ochre occur occasionally elsewhere, I rate this deposit more than just an okay ochre.

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 31, 2017 at 4:42 AM

Western mountain ash

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At various places in Glacier National Park and Waterton Lakes National Park we noticed plants with conspicuous clusters of orange fruits, like this one in Glacier National Park on August 30th. Teagan Tomlin of the National Park Service identified it for me as western mountain ash, Sorbus scopulina. Notice how the orange discolorations on some of the leaflets match the color of the fruit.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

 

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 8, 2017 at 4:56 AM

Red Rock Canyon Open Space

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Just a mile south of Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs is Red Rock Canyon Open Space. While its formations aren’t nearly as well known nor as extensive or impressive, the rocks do offer up some pleasant colors and intricate patterns. Here are two panels of stone that caught my attention on June 7th. As far as I know, the hole in the center of the second picture is natural.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 3, 2017 at 4:49 AM

Sphaeralcea coccinea

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Remember Nebraska’s Chimney Rock? When we visited on May 28th, I photographed these flowers of Sphaeralcea coccinea, called scarlet globemallow, caliche globemallow, and copper mallow. The article linked to in the previous sentence points out that “While on the course of his expedition, near the Marias River [in what is now Montana], Meriwether Lewis collected a specimen of this species.” In fact it grows across much of the western United States. I’ve seen scarlet globemallow in Texas’s hot Trans-Pecos region, so the species tolerates a broad range of temperatures.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 31, 2017 at 4:45 AM

Nebraska like Antarctica

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Okay, there are times when Nebraska gets really cold, but not that cold. No, it’s not temperature I have in mind: don’t you think that the outline of these lichens is like that of Antarctica? Following in the footsteps of Amundsen, I strode to the top of Scott’s Bluff National Monument on May 28th and metaphorically planted my photographic flag there.

If you’d like a much closer look at a portion of these lichens, click to expand this excerpt:

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 21, 2017 at 5:00 AM

Spearfish Formation

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On June 1st I was taken with this colorful bluff of the Belle Fourche [Beautiful Fork] River in Hulett, Wyoming. As far as I can tell, these rock layers are part of what geologists call the Spearfish Formation.

Half an hour later we saw more of it at Devil’s Tower.

Finally, on the way back to the Black Hills, we saw even more along Interstate 90:

I can’t remember if this last place was still in Wyoming or if we’d already crossed back into South Dakota.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 17, 2017 at 4:40 AM

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