Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘New Mexico

Sunday sunset 3

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On each of the four Sundays in January you’re seeing sunset pictures from the state whose license plates praise it as the Land of Enchantment. This photograph of a silhouetted dead tree is from June 10, 2017, at Camel Rock, 11 miles north of Santa Fe.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 21, 2018 at 4:57 AM

Sunday sunset 2

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8:10 PM

On each of the four Sundays in January you’re seeing sunset pictures from the state whose license plates proclaim it the Land of Enchantment.

8:18 PM

These three photographs date back to June 10, 2017, at Camel Rock, 11 miles north of downtown Santa Fe. I don’t notice any overlap between the first two pictures. The third, however, zooms in on an area recognizable near the bottom of the second photograph, so you can see how cloud shapes and colors had changed in five minutes.

8:23 PM

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 14, 2018 at 4:54 AM

Sunday sunset 1

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As it would be hard to find anything more appropriate for a Sunday than a sunset, on the four Sundays in January you’ll be seeing sunset pictures. Today’s are from June 10, 2017, at Camel Rock, 11 miles north of downtown Santa Fe. Speaking of 11, that’s how many minutes elapsed between the first photograph and the second.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 7, 2018 at 4:31 AM

Camel Rock

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Here’s a view from June 10th showing Camel Rock, a landmark on the main highway some 11 miles north of downtown Santa Fe. When I first visited Camel Rock nearly half a century ago, anyone could walk up to it and even onto it. Now I found the structure ringed by a fence. While I appreciate the protection, the fence made it hard to take pictures because I couldn’t get close enough to stand or sit where I wanted to. Oh well, I did what I could, aided by one of those famous New Mexico sunsets.

Do you see the rocky outline of the camel, complete with a hoodoo for a head and neck? If you’d like a look back at other pareidolic images that have appeared here in 2016 and 2017, click “pareidolia” in the “Tagged with” section at the bottom of this post and scroll down through the results. (There are bound to be instances in older posts as well, but I learned the term pareidolia only last year.)

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 2, 2017 at 4:42 AM

More of the world below

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More visual notes from the underground in New Mexico’s Carlsbad Caverns National Park on June 14th.

It took aeons for an inorganic process, dripping water, to deposit the minerals that built up these intricate formations. Nevertheless, don’t their tops remind you of the branching growth patterns seen in a living organism like broccoli?

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 24, 2017 at 4:40 AM

The world below

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750 feet underground in Carlsbad Caverns National Park lie the caverns. When we visited a couple of decades ago we didn’t think that much of them. On June 14th of this year we took the 1.25-mile self-guided walk through what’s called the Big Room and found its formations quite impressive. The caverns haven’t changed in 20 years. It seems we have.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 23, 2017 at 4:51 AM

Carlsbad canyons

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No, the title isn’t a typo or thinko: I meant Carlsbad canyons. While almost everyone goes to Carlsbad Caverns National Park to see the caverns, the road in from the highway passes through some scenic canyons whose grand scale makes them worth stopping for in their own right, as we found out on June 14th. It’s a harsh land of little rain, where many plants have a hard time making a go of it.

One plant that thrives there is Dasylirion wheeleri, known even in English by the name that the Spaniards took from the Aztecs: sotol. Below you see a sotol flower stalk (which people joke is so tall).

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 22, 2017 at 5:08 AM

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