Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘Nebraska

Another white

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At the top of Scott’s Bluff in western Nebraska on May 29th I noticed some plants that formed low mounds of white flowers, like the one above that has some other plants growing up inside it. How rude.

I later learned that the white-flowered plants are desert sandwort (Eremogone hookeri). Below is closeup of some of the flowers densely packed into one of those mounds.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

September 5, 2017 at 4:48 AM

Standing milk-vetch flowers

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At the top of Scott’s Bluff in western Nebraska on May 29th I saw flowers of standing milk-vetch, Astragalus laxmannii.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 30, 2017 at 4:55 AM

Cryptantha thyrsiflora

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Atop Scott’s Bluff in western Nebraska I saw some smallish white flowers that later got identified as Cryptantha thyrsiflora. Vernacular names for the plant include calcareous cryptantha, calcareous popcornflower, limestone cat’s eye, mountain cat’s eye, and miner’s candle. By the time I took this picture on May 29th, many of the flowers had already wilted, as you can see.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 14, 2017 at 4:50 AM

A tiny fly on narrowleaf penstemon flowers

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It was late in the afternoon on May 28th and the wind had picked up at the top of Scott’s Bluff National Monument in western Nebraska. Concentrating on the tiny fly that became my subject once I noticed it, I had to let most of the flowers fade out of focus in order for the fly to stay sharp. The flowers are Penstemon angustifolius, called narrowleaf penstemon or narrowleaf beardtongue. Call the photographer Nimbletongue Beardface and you might not be far wrong.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 2, 2017 at 5:00 AM

Scott’s Bluff in the morning

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At the top of Scott’s Bluff on May 28th, the late-afternoon wind had taken to blowing so hard that we drove back down to get away from it, resolving to come again the following day before continuing north through Nebraska to South Dakota. Here’s the prairie view that greeted us that next morning as we looked west from the western fringe of the town. Don’t you wish you had one of these 800-foot-tall geological fortresses conveniently sitting at the edge of your town so you could play on and around it whenever you wanted to?

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 1, 2017 at 4:51 AM

Sphaeralcea coccinea

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Remember Nebraska’s Chimney Rock? When we visited on May 28th, I photographed these flowers of Sphaeralcea coccinea, called scarlet globemallow, caliche globemallow, and copper mallow. The article linked to in the previous sentence points out that “While on the course of his expedition, near the Marias River [in what is now Montana], Meriwether Lewis collected a specimen of this species.” In fact it grows across much of the western United States. I’ve seen scarlet globemallow in Texas’s hot Trans-Pecos region, so the species tolerates a broad range of temperatures.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 31, 2017 at 4:45 AM

Death camas

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On May 29th atop Scott’s Bluff National Monument in Nebraska I found no shortage of Zigandenus venenosus flowers. You can recognize that the scientific species name means ‘poisonous.’ The common name death camas is no exaggeration, as people have died from eating the various species of this pretty wildflower. And speaking of the genus Zigadenus, a few of you may remember that I belatedly showed an Austin species back in 2015.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 29, 2017 at 5:00 AM

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