Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘mountains

Relenting again

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Okay, maybe I was a bit hasty last time in writing off Jasper National Park’s Maligne Lake, whose northern end we drove to on September 5th. Compare the rugged mountains that loom over the lake with the closer one that imposes itself, smoother and lakeless, on anyone who looks to the left of the direction that yielded the first view. In both cases, even so late into the summer, patches of ice remained on the mountains.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 14, 2017 at 4:41 AM

Banff National Park’s famous Lake Louise late in the afternoon on September 8th

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Maybe you were beginning to wonder if you’d ever get to see a picture of the famous Lake Louise. Here’s one with a twin bonus: a halo of crepuscular rays above the mountains that border the lake, and, coming to meet you, the tinged reflection of the late light on the lake’s surface.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 8, 2017 at 4:54 AM

Mount Edith Cavell

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On the morning of September 5th we went to the visitor center in Jasper and got a permit for that afternoon to drive up to Mount Edith Cavell. (Renovation of the parking lot there prompted the rationing of parking spaces throughout 2017.) After reaching the lot, we hiked to the overlook for the mountain. The photograph above, taken at a mildly wide-angle focal length of 40mm, shows the meltwater lake at the base of one face of the mountain. If you click the thumbnail below you’ll suddenly find yourself looking much more closely at a prettily patterned portion of pale blue ice on the lake’s far shore, thanks to the magic of my telephoto lens zoomed to its maximum 400mm.

Two weeks after our visit, the road to Mount Edith Cavell closed for the season.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

 

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 27, 2017 at 4:48 AM

Speaking of Kananaskis

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Speaking of Alberta’s Kananaskis Range, the site of the previous post, here’s Lower Kananaskis Lake as we saw it on September 11th. Wind gusts created ripples on the lake’s surface that must have resonated with the folds of my cerebrum, because I felt compelled to keep taking pictures of the changing ripples.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 19, 2017 at 4:50 AM

Bishop’s Cap Mountain and more

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When you scanned the previous picture from Glacier National Park on August 31st, did your glance get caught on the rocky protrusion way off to the left in the same way it probably did on the much more prominent Pollock Mountain? This time you get a closer of view of Bishop’s Cap Mountain, which is the name of that other peak. Despite the appearance of blue sky, there were clouds, and they moved rather quickly. You see the shadows of two of them, one to the right of the picture’s center and the other in the lower left corner. Intruding itself at the lower right, immobile, is a flank of Pollock Mountain.

So much depended on where I looked. The picture of Bishop’s Cap shows a clearer view than I had for much of the rest of the day. Compare that to the photograph I took two-and-a-half minutes later, also from the Logan Pass visitor center, facing in a different direction.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 16, 2017 at 5:01 AM

Crowfoot Glacier seen from and in Bow Lake

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On September 4th we headed north up the Icefields Parkway, often considered one of the most scenic drives in the world. It is. The first place along the route where we spent significant time was Bow Lake, shown here with the Crowfoot Glacier reflected in it.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 9, 2017 at 5:01 AM

Wild Goose Island

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Here’s a non-traditional photograph of Wild Goose Island in St. Mary Lake in Glacier National Park on August 30th. I say it’s non traditional because the island is such a small element compared to the dead tree in the foreground that dominates the image. You could add that the photograph is unconventional because instead of clarity and blue water and snow-covered mountains, you get a smoky wildfire haze that has muted the details. Those same observations apply to the picture of Wild Goose Island below, which I made ten minutes later from another pullover on the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 3, 2017 at 4:48 AM

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