Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘Jasper National Park

Athabasca Glacier

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A year ago today we stopped along the Icefields Parkway to see the Athabasca Glacier in Jasper National Park, Alberta.

Plenty of ice and snow remained on the adjacent mountains as well, even at this warmest time of the year.

Below is a mostly downward look at how the moving Athabasca Glacier once scratched its way across a level expanse of upturned rock strata.

Near the scratched rocks I saw some low, fluffy mounds of what I take to be a species of Dryas, likely D. drummondii or D. octopetala. I learned that Dryas is in the rose family, and its seed heads are akin to those of its family mate Fallugia paradoxa, known as Apache plume.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

September 6, 2018 at 4:46 AM

Monday mountains 5

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Today is the last of the five Mondays in this Mondayful January. Continuing with the month’s mountain sequence, here’s a look at Pyramid Mountain, which looms large outside the Jasper townsite in Jasper National Park, Alberta. The date was September 5, 2017.

When I looked in the opposite direction, I saw what amounted to one big set of antlers on an elk.

© 2018 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 29, 2018 at 4:50 AM

Sunwapta Falls: looking upstream and downstream

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On September 6th we spent a little time at Sunwapta Falls in Jasper National Park, Alberta. The first picture may give you the impression that the roaring river was carrying the roughly spherical boulder over the falls. Not so: it stayed put. The dead tree trunk lodged against the boulder was also stable, at least for the duration of our visit. Sooner or later, of course, the river will sweep each one downstream.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

December 15, 2017 at 4:46 AM

Relenting again

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Okay, maybe I was a bit hasty last time in writing off Jasper National Park’s Maligne Lake, whose northern end we drove to on September 5th. Compare the rugged mountains that loom over the lake with the closer one that imposes itself, smoother and lakeless, on anyone who looks to the left of the direction that yielded the first view. In both cases, even so late into the summer, patches of ice remained on the mountains.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 14, 2017 at 4:41 AM

I didn’t find the Maligne River malign

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No, I didn’t find the Maligne River malign at all. In fact I found it more interesting photographically than Maligne Lake when we visited on September 5th.

From a little bridge over the river at the place where it empties out of the lake I looked down at colors and rocks and patterns in the water.

Adjacent to the stillness and ripples a bit of whitewater asserted itself.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 13, 2017 at 5:59 AM

The shallows of Medicine Lake

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An adjective often applied to Jasper National Park’s Medicine Lake is “disappearing.” That’s because in the fall, when there hasn’t been much meltwater flowing into the lake for a while, the water level goes down—even to the point that the lake disappears. The previous post showed you that when we reached the northern end of Medicine Lake on September 5th it still looked like a lake. As we continued south, the water kept dropping until we saw what seemed more like a broad, shallow river with lots of sandbars in it. You’re welcome to read more about this strange lake that isn’t always a lake.

If the craft of photography interests you, newly added point 29 in About My Techniques offers some insight into today’s picture. So does point 9.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 2, 2017 at 4:51 AM

Medicine Lake

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On September 5th, heading south through Jasper National Park along Maligne Lake Rd., we came to Medicine Lake. Shown here is the lake’s northeast corner, beyond which you see the remains of a forest burned in an earlier fire. And again there’s the color through the water.

© 2017 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

November 1, 2017 at 4:44 AM

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