Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Posts Tagged ‘Arkansas

Tulip poplar

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Tulip Poplar Leaf 8699

While on the grounds of the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, on June 20 I saw some tulip poplar trees, Liriodendron tulipifera. Their leaves have a distinctively simple yet pleasing shape, don’t you think?

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 30, 2016 at 4:59 AM

Posted in nature photography

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Rudbeckia to the max

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Swamp Coneflower Flower Head 8764

Yet another thing I saw on the grounds of the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, on June 20 was Rudbeckia maxima, known as giant coneflower, great coneflower, and large or giant brown-eyed susan. In contrast to the regular brown-eyed susan, Rudbeckia hirta, this one produces flower stalks that can grow to be 7 ft. tall.

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 29, 2016 at 5:00 AM

Like a sand dune

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Metallic Green Bee on the Palm of My Hand 8821

It may look as if this little metallic green bee had come to rest on the crest of a sand dune with a desert storm threatening to blow in from beyond. Actually the landing place was the heel of my left hand, which with difficulty I twisted around to make the bee parallel to the sensor in the camera that I held in my right hand and took photographs with. (Oh, unorthodox me, but I did get pictures of the bee.)

Like the last several photographs, this one is from the grounds of the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, on June 20.

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 28, 2016 at 4:58 AM

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What made the nonagons

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Drops in Spiderweb 8745B

Click for larger size and greater detail.

I believe that light refracted by drops of water caught in the spider’s web you saw last time made the glass elements in my 100mm macro lens produce the nonagonal artifacts that you also saw. What you didn’t see was the drops, so here’s another photograph from the same session at the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, on June 20. Notice that some of the nonagons in this second photograph are elongated.

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 27, 2016 at 5:06 AM

Spider and polygons in the morning

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Spider and Nonagons of Light 8737

Another thing I saw on the grounds of the Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, on June 20 was this tiny spider, the main part of which my 100mm macro lens resolved quite nicely. The morning sun in front of me lit up some strands of silk in the web while also causing the lens to create polygonal artifacts of light. Those nonagons have better definition than the red ones I showed you in 2013.

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 26, 2016 at 4:30 AM

I know more about cosh than cohosh

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Black Cohosh Flowers and Buds 8675

I know more about cosh* than cohosh. That said, on the way back home from the Midwest we stopped for a couple of nights in Bentonville, Arkansas, to visit the Crystal Bridges Museum for a second time, and on the museum’s landscaped grounds on June 20th I photographed some appealing flowers and buds of black cohosh, Actaea racemosa var. racemosa. The genus name was formerly Cimicifuga, which means ‘makes bedbugs go away,’ and an alternate common name is bugbane, but whether black cohosh really has that property, I don’t know.

If you’re interested in the craft of photography, I’ll add that in taking this picture I made good use of point 4 in About My Techniques. The fact that a shaft of sunlight illuminated the black cohosh inflorescence amplified the contrast between black and white. Points 1, 2, and 18 also came into play.


* In trigonometry, cosh is the hyperbolic cosine.

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

August 25, 2016 at 5:12 AM

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