Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

From fire to fog

with 14 comments

The weather forecast on the evening of December 21st last year said to expect fog the next morning in the eastern reaches of Austin. Because we don’t often get fog, I went to the Blackland Prairie in northeast Austin early that morning to see if I could find some. Along the way I stopped to photograph some other things (including the fiery clouds you saw last time), so I arrived only a short while before the rising sun dissipated the fog. Even so, I did get a few misty pictures. The one above, which reminds me of an old sepia-toned photograph, came nine minutes before the one below, which seems split-toned. In fact the tinting in both cases was nature’s and the camera’s own.

© 2021 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

January 5, 2021 at 4:36 AM

14 Responses

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  1. I love a good, foggy morning though not so much if I have to drive in it! Anadarko sits in a basin, so we see a lot of fog here. Your first image has a foreboding look to it. For some reason, my senses are heightened on viewing that image as opposed to the second one where daylight filters through.

    Littlesundog

    January 5, 2021 at 8:08 AM

    • Given your experience driving in heavy fog, I understand how the first image gives you a feeling of foreboding. As with other things we’ve discussed, I was free of practicality here and could revel in the fog for its own sake (and of course the sake of photographs). Maybe your heightened senses also come from experience, because you need to be more alert when fog obscures details.

      Steve Schwartzman

      January 5, 2021 at 8:14 AM

  2. Living in a moister climate I do not get excited about fog as much as you do. Yet I must admit because of this lack of enthusiasm I have not attempted to take photos in the fog. It goes to show we often go after things that are rare. Your beautiful photos in sepia were worth the effort of getting up so early in the morning,.
    I am back from my blogging break and hope you had a joyful and relaxing Christmas season. I will resume my blogging activity with Wednesday’s Photos. Thank you for your patience, Steve!

    Peter Klopp

    January 5, 2021 at 9:20 AM

    • Welcome back from your hiatus, and happy 2021 to you.

      Maybe now you’ll experiment with pictures of fog, given that it’s more available to you up there and these pictures have made you aware of the possibilities. If only the fog had lasted longer (or I’d gotten to it sooner), I’d have taken many more pictures.

      Steve Schwartzman

      January 5, 2021 at 11:40 AM

  3. Fog can really add atmosphere to a photo (guess that’s like a bad pun, eh?). I also love how quiet the world seems when covered in fog. Can be very peaceful.

    Todd Henson

    January 5, 2021 at 10:10 AM

    • Fog adding atmosphere sounds like good wordplay to me. Your mention of fog being quiet reminds me of how quiet things were when I was out in a snowfall as a kid on Long Island.

      Steve Schwartzman

      January 5, 2021 at 11:35 AM

  4. I love fog, as long as I am not driving through it. Nature and cameras can sure come up with some good ones. Fog under porch lights at night is a favorite. I’ve watched it write and curl under the lights like a living thing.

    Lavinia Ross

    January 5, 2021 at 8:51 PM

    • I’m not familiar with fog under porch lights. Maybe you should include it in one of your posts.

      Steve Schwartzman

      January 5, 2021 at 9:41 PM

  5. Those look familiar. Watching things change as the fog lifts is always an enjoyable way to spend some time. Both are nice captures of that.

    Steve Gingold

    January 6, 2021 at 4:03 AM

    • You have a lot more experience with fog than I do. Too bad it doesn’t envelop Austin more often.

      Steve Schwartzman

      January 6, 2021 at 5:06 AM

  6. I’m quite fond of sepia-toned images, but the phrase ‘split-toned’ was new to me. I think now that I’ve seen it used without recognizing the technique. Recognizing the effect in nature no doubt takes a sharper eye and a little more skill than just slapping on a filter.

    shoreacres

    January 8, 2021 at 8:57 AM

    • You could say both of these photographs were filter-free and fancy-free, but probably not that I was slap-happy.

      Steve Schwartzman

      January 8, 2021 at 10:17 AM

  7. How quickly things change, especially anything weather-related!

    bluebrightly

    January 14, 2021 at 1:53 PM


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