Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Green

with 29 comments

‘Tis not shamrocks but wood-sorrel (Oxalis spp.) greening the ground in our back yard on February 25th.

And if it’s more three-part green leaves ye be craving, here’s another view of southern dewberry
(Rubus trivialis),
this time from February 27th in the northeast quadrant of Mopac and US 183:

© 2019 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 17, 2019 at 4:46 AM

29 Responses

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  1. beautiful, especially the one with the flower buds

    gwenniesgardenworld

    March 17, 2019 at 5:01 AM

  2. This bit o’ the green is nicer than the vile green they die the Chicago River every year.

    melissabluefineart

    March 17, 2019 at 7:57 AM

  3. Even if it’s not Shamrock, it is still fitting for St. Patrick’s Day. I wish you a happy one,
    Pit

    Pit

    March 17, 2019 at 9:55 AM

  4. ☘️

    ksbeth

    March 17, 2019 at 10:33 AM

  5. This is great! maybe not shamrocks but they’ll do very nicely! cheers, Robbie O’Frosty.

    Robert Parker

    March 17, 2019 at 12:45 PM

    • In response to your cheers I’ll wish you greetings and greenings.

      Steve Schwartzman

      March 17, 2019 at 1:10 PM

      • That wouldn’t look bad on a St Paddy’s Day shirt “Greetings & Greenings”

        Robert Parker

        March 17, 2019 at 1:50 PM

        • And equally appropriately on a botanist’s or nature lover’s shirt. I thought the phrase “greetings and greenings” might be unique, and apparently it almost is, the one exception that turned up being in connection with a company that purports to sell the world’s best cat litter. When I reversed the phrase to “greenings and greetings” I got no hits. Interestingly, in response to both searches Google asked if I meant “greetings and greetings.” My answer is no and no.

          Steve Schwartzman

          March 17, 2019 at 3:28 PM

  6. Perfect for the day, or any day, really!

    Susan Scheid

    March 17, 2019 at 7:39 PM

  7. I’ve been so distracted by this and that, I didn’t even realize yesterday was St. Patrick’s day until I saw your post. I’m sure my Irish ancestors are aghast, or would have been, were they still around. The oxalis makes a perfectly acceptable symbol for the day, besides being pretty all on its own.

    When I was looking at the dewberries yesterday, I was suprised to find full-sized berries on the vines already. It won’t be long until birds and people have a seasonal feast ready for them again.

    shoreacres

    March 18, 2019 at 6:51 AM

    • Then your dewberries are way ahead of ours; I haven’t seen a single fruit that’s even getting started.

      Speaking of holidays, when I encountered unusually light traffic this morning I first wondered if today is a holiday I’d forgotten about. Turns out it’s spring break for all the schools here. Then it occurred to me that the way to solve Austin’s traffic problems is to permanently close all the schools. In many cases there’d be no marked difference in what the students come away knowing, and we’d save a ton on property taxes. Oh, cynical me.

      Steve Schwartzman

      March 18, 2019 at 10:00 AM

  8. Dewy Dewberry. There must be a 4-leaved Oxalis in all that? Probably in there with Waldo.

    Steve Gingold

    March 18, 2019 at 2:34 PM

    • Somehow I’ve never thought about a four-part oxalis leaf. What’s good for clover should be good for oxalis, right?

      Steve Schwartzman

      March 18, 2019 at 9:55 PM

      • Yep. Saw them on Google.

        Steve Gingold

        March 19, 2019 at 3:35 AM

        • In the results of your Google search I noticed Oxalis tetraphylla, whose species name says that four is the norm for that species. Maybe someday I’ll find a rare four-parter in a species of oxalis that’s normally a three-parter.

          Steve Schwartzman

          March 19, 2019 at 5:48 AM

  9. Southern dewberry? That is a Rubus that I never heard of. Are the berries any good?

    tonytomeo

    March 21, 2019 at 12:04 AM


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