Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Sand coreopsis

with 21 comments

Sand Coreopsis Flower Head 7010

The wildflower I saw the most at Illinois Beach State Park in early June was the sand coreopsis, Coreopsis lanceolata.

Sand Coreopsis Flower Head from Behind 7015

© Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

July 13, 2016 at 5:00 AM

21 Responses

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  1. very nice

    nalinidesignprofile

    July 13, 2016 at 5:03 AM

  2. Common is often beautiful as is plainly evident in these shots, Steve.

    Steve Gingold

    July 13, 2016 at 5:10 AM

  3. Well done, Steven.

    elmdriveimages

    July 13, 2016 at 6:52 AM

    • Thank you. I wish I could walk down to the beach this morning and take more photographs of these and other flowers.

      Steve Schwartzman

      July 13, 2016 at 9:08 AM

  4. So perfect

    Chas Spain

    July 13, 2016 at 7:10 AM

  5. Absolute perfection! Many thanks for sharing this one.

  6. I really like the bold and stylized first photo. The slight variations among the tips of the rays are especially fun, but I have to confess, as a group, they remind me of webbed feet.

    The second photo’s the interesting one, with its three layers. The rays and green sepals are obvious, but what about that middle layer? Are those differently colored sepals, or shadows, or something else? I do love coreopsis, and this one’s particularly attractive.

    shoreacres

    July 13, 2016 at 10:34 AM

    • Eve also asked about that middle layer. Unfortunately I don’t know the answer. I’d run over to the beach and take a look if that weren’t a 1300+ mile jaunt.

      The tips of the rays are similar to those of the Nueces coreopsis that ranges to about an hour’s drive south of Austin:

      https://portraitsofwildflowers.wordpress.com/2012/04/21/nueces-coreopsis/

      Steve Schwartzman

      July 13, 2016 at 10:42 AM

      • It was fun to scroll through your coreopsis archives. I’m certain now that it’s Coreopsis tinctoria that filled the Galveston cemetery. I’m hoping I have some photos that show a bit of the same “golden wave” effect that you captured at Brushy Creek Lake.

        shoreacres

        July 14, 2016 at 12:53 PM

        • That colony alongside Brushy Creek Lake remains the best I’ve ever seen in the Austin area. From what you said a while back, the colony in the Galveston Cemetery this spring must have rivaled it—and Galveston is a place where you can see real waves and not just golden ones.

          Steve Schwartzman

          July 14, 2016 at 1:36 PM

  7. Exquisite definition ..

    Julie@frogpondfarm

    July 14, 2016 at 3:27 AM

  8. It’s beautiful from both angles.

    My Small Surrenders

    July 16, 2016 at 9:49 AM

  9. I admire the sharp shapes of the petals of this flower. It appeals to my fondness for geometry. I’m not sure if there is something odd about my eyes but when I quickly glance at the shot on and off, the petals seem to move outwards and become longer briefly. I wonder if anyone else sees this illusion.

    Jane

    July 21, 2016 at 10:47 PM

    • And I admire the sound of the words “sharp shapes.” I tried your quick glances on and off but my eyes proved stodgy rather than dodgy and I didn’t see the illusion you described. At other times, though, shapes have seemed to expand or contract as I’ve scrolled an image.

      Steve Schwartzman

      July 21, 2016 at 11:14 PM


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