Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

f/2.8

with 12 comments

Sneezeweed Flower Head 3951

It’s rare that I use my macro lens wide open at f/2.8. On the contrary, in closeups I’m usually trying for extended depth of field and therefore stopping down as much as the light allows. There wasn’t much light in the forested, canyony part of Great Hills Park where I found myself on the morning of May 9th, so f/2.8 it was for this limited-focus portrait of a sneezeweed flower head, Helenium quadridentatum.

Note: I’m away from home and will be for a good while. Please understand if I’m late replying to your comments.

© 2016 Steven Schwartzman

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Written by Steve Schwartzman

June 4, 2016 at 5:02 AM

12 Responses

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  1. Good shot, Steven.

    elmdriveimages

    June 4, 2016 at 6:58 AM

  2. Vivid detail. Can I assume with such an evocative name that it does cause sneezing? 🙂

    Sally

    June 4, 2016 at 7:00 AM

  3. I like this photo – I often go back and forth between getting it sharp or a more dreamy look. However sometimes the conditions like you experienced dictates it for us!!

    norasphotos4u

    June 4, 2016 at 9:19 AM

    • Yes indeed, sometimes life is a dictator. In this case I worried about the shallow depth of field at the time I took the picture but was pleased with the way it came out. It strikes me as a combination of sharp and dreamy.

      Steve Schwartzman

      June 4, 2016 at 9:56 PM

  4. Very nice macro.

    Beautywhizz

    June 4, 2016 at 3:50 PM

  5. Into the Great Wide Open, a song by Tom Petty, wasn’t talking about your f/2.8 shot but it is the great wide open of selective focus. Boy was that stretching a tie in to a song. Anyway, it works very well in this image.

    Steve Gingold

    June 4, 2016 at 4:45 PM

    • I like your phrase “the great wide open of selective focus” and I don’t think you stretched too far. Maybe that’s because I’m a stretcher too. In any case, I’m glad you find the image works. You appreciate the limitations of the lens.

      Steve Schwartzman

      June 4, 2016 at 10:06 PM


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