Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Prairie fleabane daisy open and attractive

with 12 comments

Tiny Bee on Prairie Fleabane Daisy 3270

And here, from the same group of prairie fleabane daisies, Erigeron modestus, that I found on March 11th along Stonelake Blvd. is an open flower head that had attracted a tiny bee. From the saturated tips of the opening rays that you saw last time, would you have predicted that most of the color would soon disappear? Speaking of disappearing, I’ve sometimes wondered if flowers like this inspired the now-long-gone European fad of wearing a ruff. And speaking of wondering, if you’d like to know how big this flower head was, the answer is about an inch in diameter.

Β© 2014 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

March 29, 2014 at 6:01 AM

12 Responses

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. You’re right, it does look like a ruff!

    Emily Heath

    March 29, 2014 at 7:36 AM

  2. Bee studying Fibonacci.

    Jim in IA

    March 29, 2014 at 8:19 AM

    • For readers unfamiliar with the Fibonacci numbers, they’re the sequence

      1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, …

      where each new number (after the initial 1, 1) is the sum of the two numbers that come before it. In many daisies, the numbers of interwoven spirals of florets in the central disk are often consecutive Fibonacci numbers. I just looked at a photograph of a fleabane daisy without a bee on it and I was able to count 21 spirals of florets going out clockwise from the center and 34 spirals of florets going out counter-clockwise.

      Steve Schwartzman

      March 29, 2014 at 8:41 AM

      • πŸ™‚

        Jim in IA

        March 29, 2014 at 9:16 AM

        • :-), :-), πŸ™‚ :-), πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ :-), πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ :-), πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ :-), …

          Steve Schwartzman

          March 29, 2014 at 9:24 AM

          • πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ :-), … is the way I see it. ❗

            Jim in IA

            March 29, 2014 at 9:29 AM

  3. looks like a wasp.

    sedge808

    March 30, 2014 at 9:17 PM

  4. I just spent some time with my little collection of photos from Sunday and Tveten’s book, and realized I found fleabane daisy. Mine is white, with no trace of pink, but the Tvetens mentioned that there’s color variation. Those “150 or more threadlike rays” are a pretty good clue, though.

    shoreacres

    April 3, 2014 at 8:57 AM

    • Ah, but the fleabane daisy you have near the coast is Erigeron philadelphicus, which indeed can have 150 very slender rays that tend to be pure white. Along with the Erigeron modestus shown here, we have that species in Austin as well, and in fact I photographed some yesterday. This being spring, I’ve already taken more pictures than I can conveniently show, but I’ll try to include a Philadelphia fleabane in the weeks ahead.

      Steve Schwartzman

      April 3, 2014 at 9:18 AM

  5. […] raysβ€”John and Gloria Tveten say the count of threadlike segments can go above 150β€”than the prairie fleabane you’ve seen here several […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: