Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

Inland sea oats at an inland waterfall

with 23 comments

Inland Sea Oats at Chalk Ridge Falls 5147

Here you see seed heads of inland sea oats, Chasmanthium latifolium, hanging into the void above Chalk Ridge Falls in Bell County on August 28.

© 2013 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

September 1, 2013 at 11:05 AM

23 Responses

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  1. Beautiful composition and lighting, Steven!

    cindydyer

    September 1, 2013 at 11:11 AM

  2. C’est tellement parfait qu’à chaque fois j’ouvre de grands yeux quand je viens chez toi!

    chatou11

    September 1, 2013 at 11:37 AM

  3. I cannot decide if they are quiet or gently moving, regardless I enjoyed them.

    lensandpensbysally

    September 1, 2013 at 12:21 PM

    • The out-of-focus water in the falls was of course moving, but the plant in the foreground was pretty still, luckily for me. At the same time, I couldn’t get down as low as I would’ve liked to because I was on the edge of a precipice, so it was hard to get the various seed heads in focus at the same time.

      Steve Schwartzman

      September 1, 2013 at 12:36 PM

  4. Great photo. Are these related to the sea oats on the beach?

    norasphotos4u

    September 1, 2013 at 12:23 PM

    • There’s a plant known as sea oats that botanists classify as Uniola paniculata, which is still a grass but a different genus. Is that the species you had in mind?

      Steve Schwartzman

      September 1, 2013 at 12:39 PM

      • I dont know. Just wondering if you knew. I don’t have a botany background, but have learned a lot from your posts plus you do great photography which is what first attracted me to the site.

        norasphotos4u

        September 1, 2013 at 12:47 PM

        • Actually I don’t have a botany background either; I wish I’d taken even an introductory botany course in college. The things I now know—and have been able to pass along—involve some of the species native to my area, which I came to via photography rather than the other way around. I’ve learned that a common name for a plant can be ambiguous, which is why I asked if you had a particular species in mind when you asked about sea oats. But what’s in a name? That which we call a photograph by any other name would look as good.

          Steve Schwartzman

          September 1, 2013 at 2:16 PM

  5. This is beautiful – makes me think of autumn and the colours to come!

    Cathy

    September 1, 2013 at 1:16 PM

    • In Bavaria you can think of autumn now, while here in central Texas the afternoon high temperature is still around 39°C (102°F) and I come home from a photo outing with my clothing soaked through with sweat. All the more reason to look forward to October.

      Steve Schwartzman

      September 1, 2013 at 2:21 PM

  6. So simple and so beautiful. Good light!

    bentehaarstad

    September 1, 2013 at 2:09 PM

    • I think that along with good day, good afternoon, and good night, you’ve invented a new salutation for photographers: good light!

      Steve Schwartzman

      September 1, 2013 at 2:22 PM

  7. Such delightful lighting!

    Dave

    September 2, 2013 at 2:34 AM

    • I like the sound of “delightful lighting.” For you the white background, even though it was falling water, may conjure up ice and snow.

      Steve Schwartzman

      September 2, 2013 at 8:54 AM

      • I didn’t realize it was water!

        Dave

        September 2, 2013 at 10:16 AM

        • The waterfall was so out of focus (which was a good thing, so as not to distract from the seed heads) that there was no reason for anyone to recognize the water.

          Steve Schwartzman

          September 2, 2013 at 10:40 AM

  8. Such a beautiful photograph. I had no idea there were inland sea oats. The sea oats native to our coast are Uniola paniculata. They had disappeared from Galveston Island, primarily because of hurricanes, and there was a project to begin restoring them to the dunes there.

    Here’s a link to the project that includes an abstract.

    shoreacres

    September 2, 2013 at 7:13 AM

    • For me the process was reversed. First I got to know inland sea oats, a common grass in shaded places in central Texas, and then the “inland” and the “sea” in the name made me realize that this species was being contrasted with one that grows near the seashore, the Uniola paniculata that you mention. Figure 6 in the document that you link to reminds me of the pine seedlings that are being planted in Bastrop to try to restore the trees destroyed in the catastrophic fire that began two years ago this very weekend.

      Steve Schwartzman

      September 2, 2013 at 9:00 AM

  9. Beautiful detail shot.

    mflahertyphoto

    September 3, 2013 at 2:44 PM

    • Thanks. I happened to see this again today, and it wasn’t looking as good, so I’m glad I photographed it when I did.

      Steve Schwartzman

      September 3, 2013 at 3:53 PM

  10. […] may remember a picture posted here on September 1st showing seed heads of inland sea oats that I photographed hanging into the void above Chalk Ridge Falls in Bell County on August 28. […]


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