Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

An even closer look and another name

with 5 comments

Old Plainsman Flowers by Prairie Verbena 8249

Click for better detail and much larger size.

I’ve been referring to Hymenopappus scabiosaeus as old plainsman, but another folksy name for the plant is woolly-white, which this closer view may explain. As was true two posts ago, the purple comes from flowers of prairie verbena, Glandularia bipinnatifida.

Date: April 12.  Place: the corner of Corral Ln. and I-35 in south Austin.

© 2013 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

April 20, 2013 at 1:22 PM

5 Responses

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  1. Good afternoon, Steve. I married Ariana Vincent (more to the point, she married grateful me) and you and I and your lovely wife met at a small reception at her house about a year ago. I would like to thank you sincerely for brightening my mornings (and occasionally my afternoons) with your beautiful photography, botanical information, and your sly sense of humor. I greatly appreciate the contribution your art makes to my life.
    Be well,
    Michael

    Michael McIver

    April 20, 2013 at 1:42 PM

    • Hi, Michael. I’m glad that these bits of nature have been brightening your mornings (and occasionally afternoons). I don’t know whether my humor is sly, wry, or pie-in-the-sky, but thanks for appreciating it. Some of us have been around long enough that we feel and look like old plainsmen ourselves, even to the woolly-white topping.

      Steve Schwartzman

      April 20, 2013 at 5:28 PM

  2. Very pretty

    norasphotos4u

    April 20, 2013 at 2:57 PM

    • Thanks. I was out driving around today, so I can report that old plainsman and verbena were plentiful in many places.

      Steve Schwartzman

      April 20, 2013 at 5:30 PM

  3. […] its long tails. For comparison, from the April 12th outing in south Austin that brought you several recent pictures of old plainsman, I can offer you this fresher Chioides catillus on a prairie verbena, Glandularia bipinnatifida. […]


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