Portraits of Wildflowers

Perspectives on Nature Photography

A much closer look at pavonia mallow

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Pavonia Mallow Stamen Column 8192

Click for greater clarity.

Here’s another look at one of the wildflowers you saw last time, Pavonia lasiopetala, which people call rose mallow, rose pavonia, and pavonia mallow. I had this close encounter of the photographic kind in Great Hills Park on October 20.

If you’d like to step back a bit and see a whole pavonia mallow flower, you’re welcome to visit a post from 2012.

© 2014 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 24, 2014 at 5:50 AM

A floral welcome home

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Pavonia Mallows and Straggler Daisies 3945

On the morning of October 5th, after returning the previous evening from two weeks in the Great American West, I looked out one of my kitchen windows and was greeted with this wildflower display in the yard. The larger flowers are Pavonia lasiopetala, known as pavonia mallow, rose pavonia, or rose mallow. The little yellow ones are Calyptocarpus vialis, called straggler daisy, lawnflower, or horseherb.

We’re far from done with photographs from my western adventure, but for the next week or so I’ve interrupted that sequence to catch you up on the fall succession of native wildflowers in Austin. After that I’ll mix the two regions for a spell and hope the intertwined pictures spell a pleasant variety.

If you’re interested in photography as a craft, you’ll find that points 15 and 18 in About My Techniques are relevant to this photograph.

© 2014 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 23, 2014 at 5:33 AM

Pinkerton Hot Springs

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Pinkerton Hot Springs 0756

There was color of a different sort at the Pinkerton Hot Springs, which we stopped at on US 550 north of Durango on September 25th before any good stands of autumn aspens came into sight.

© 2014 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 22, 2014 at 5:42 AM

One good turn[ing of the leaves] deserves another [and closer view]

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Aspen Trees Turning Color 0858

The previous post showed aspen trees, Populus tremuloides, in the San Juan Mountains as viewed from US 550 north of Durango, Colorado, on September 25th. Eventually, as you see here, I came to places with good fall color right along the highway. The evergreens appear to be a species of spruce.

© 2014 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 21, 2014 at 5:44 AM

Aspens turning yellow

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Aspen Trees Turning Yellow on Mountain 0834

From Albuquerque we drove north and arrived in Durango, Colorado, on the afternoon of September 25th. After checking into our motel, and with several hours of daylight left, I decided to drive north on US 550, and am I glad I did. The dots along that route on the AAA map weren’t lying about the scenery as we slowly climbed into the San Juan Mountains. Before long I had my first chance ever to see some of Colorado’s aspen trees, Populus tremuloides, turning yellow. The biggest and brightest stands were initially up in the surrounding mountains, but I used my longest lens to bring the trees (visually) closer.

© 2014 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 20, 2014 at 5:32 AM

Hoary tansyasters

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Hoary tansyasters 0118

One of the most conspicuous plants I saw flowering in many places around Albuquerque was the hoary tansyaster, formerly known scientifically as Machaeranthera canescens and now as Dieteria canescens. By whatever name, vernacular or botanical, these flowers surprised my by flourishing and being so widespread in the dry climate of central New Mexico, because I’d always associated asters with more moisture than a desert provides: shows how much I know.

Today’s view is from Petroglyph National Monument in northwest Albuquerque on September 23rd. Tomorrow’s post will skip ahead two days to southwestern Colorado and quite a different source of color.

© 2014 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 19, 2014 at 5:46 AM

Apache plume really is in the rose family

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Apache Plume Flower 0061A

In case you’re having trouble believing that the plant you saw last time, the Apache plume with all the swirly strands, really is in the rose family, this picture of one of the plant’s flowers might convince you. Perhaps the paradoxa in the scientific name Fallugia paradoxa is a reflection of that surprising reality.

Like the previous photograph, this one comes from Petroglyph National Monument in northwest Albuquerque on September 23rd.

© 2014 Steven Schwartzman

Written by Steve Schwartzman

October 18, 2014 at 1:32 PM

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